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I'm working on an implementation of the memcache protocol which, at some points, uses 64 bits integer values. These values must be stored in "network byte order".

I wish there was some uint64_t htonll(uint64_t value) function to do the change, but unfortunately, if it exist, I couldn't find it.

So I have 1 or 2 questions:

  • Is there any portable (Windows, Linux, AIX) standard function to do this ?
  • If there is no such function, how would you implement it ?

I have in mind a basic implementation but I don't know how to check the endianness at compile-time to make the code portable. So your help is more than welcome here ;)

Thank you.


Here is the final solution I wrote, thanks to Brian's solution.

uint64_t htonll(uint64_t value)
{
    // The answer is 42
    static const int num = 42;

    // Check the endianness
    if (*reinterpret_cast<const char*>(&num) == num)
    {
        const uint32_t high_part = htonl(static_cast<uint32_t>(value >> 32));
        const uint32_t low_part = htonl(static_cast<uint32_t>(value & 0xFFFFFFFFLL));

        return (static_cast<uint64_t>(low_part) << 32) | high_part;
    } else
    {
        return value;
    }
}
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possible duplicate of this one stackoverflow.com/questions/809902/64-bit-ntohl-in-c –  INS Jun 11 '10 at 13:05
    
@ereOn: I also have similar question here. If possible can you take a look and let me know what wrong I am doing here? –  AKIWEB Oct 16 '13 at 5:10
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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You are probably looking for bswap_64 I think it is supported pretty much everywhere but I wouldn't call it standard.

You can easily check the endianness by creating an int with a value of 1, casting your int's address as a char* and checking the value of the first byte.

For example:

int num = 42;
if(*(char *)&num == 42)
{
   //Little Endian
}
else
{
   //Big Endian
} 

Knowing this you could also make a simple function that does the swapping.


You could also always use boost which contains endian macros which are portable cross platform.

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Thanks ;) The boost macros seem interesting. Do you have link ? –  ereOn Jun 11 '10 at 12:41
1  
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This seems to work in C; did I do anything wrong?

uint64_t htonll(uint64_t value) {
    int num = 42;
    if (*(char *)&num == 42) {
        uint32_t high_part = htonl((uint32_t)(value >> 32));
        uint32_t low_part = htonl((uint32_t)(value & 0xFFFFFFFFLL));
        return (((uint64_t)low_part) << 32) | high_part;
    } else {
        return value;
    }
}
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Came across this portable header on github

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To reduce the overhead of the "if num == ..." Use the pre-processor defines:

#if __BYTE_ORDER__ == __ORDER_LITTLE_ENDIAN__
#else
#endif
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EDIT: combining the two (used Brian's code):

uint64_t htonll(uint64_t value)
{
     int num = 42;
     if(*(char *)&num == 42)
          return (htonl(value & 0xFFFFFFFF) << 32LL) | htonl(value >> 32);
     else 
          return value;
}

Warning: untested code! Please test before using.

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2  
Does the wrong thing on Big Endian systems. –  Ben Voigt Jun 11 '10 at 12:28
    
thanks, fixed. Used brian's code. –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Jun 11 '10 at 12:42
    
@Pavel Still doesn't work. htonl() returns a 32 bits value on which you cannot call << 32LL (because you cannot shift 32 bits left on an only 32 bits value). –  ereOn Jun 11 '10 at 13:08
    
I think shifting by 32LL will do promotion of the left side, no? –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Jun 11 '10 at 15:03
    
@Pavel: no, the bit-size of the shift value doesn't change anything. gcc emits a warning: "left shift count >= width of type". And your function says that htonll(0x0102030405060708ULL) == 0xc070605. –  bstpierre Aug 2 '10 at 19:52
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