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I am using .NET Windows Forms. My MDI parent form contains the menu. If click the menu the form will be displayed. Up to now no problem.

UserForm uf = new UserForm();
uf.Show();
uf.MdiParent = this;

If I click the menu again another duplicate of the form is created. How to solve this issue?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The cleanest way is to simply track the lifetime of the form instance. Do so by subscribing the FormClosed event. For example:

    private UserForm userFormInstance;

    private void showUserForm_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        if (userFormInstance != null) {
            userFormInstance.WindowState = FormWindowState.Normal;
            userFormInstance.Focus();
        }
        else {
            userFormInstance = new UserForm();
            userFormInstance.MdiParent = this;
            userFormInstance.FormClosed += (o, ea) => userFormInstance = null;
            userFormInstance.Show();
        }
    }
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In contrast to the existing answers here, I would not recommend using a Singleton for this. The Singleton pattern is woefully overused, and is generally a "code smell" that indicates that something's gone wrong with your overall design. Singletons are generally put in the same "bucket" as global variables: you'd better have a really strong case for using it.

The simplest solution is to make an instance variable on your main form that represents the form in question, then use that to show it.

public class MainMdiForm : Form
{
    ...

    UserForm userForm;

    ...

    private void ShowUserForm()
    {
        if(userForm == null || userForm.IsDisposed)
        {
            userForm = new UserForm();
            userForm.MdiParent = this;
        }

        userForm.Show();
        userForm.BringToFront();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for not using Singleton – Mark Heath Jun 11 '10 at 13:56
    
@Adam - the singleton pattern has it's incorrect uses. I, however, believe this is one of the particular instances where a singleton is used correctly. What you'e doing is virtually the same as what's happening within the singleton anyway, only you'll end up with messier code. – GenericTypeTea Jun 11 '10 at 13:57
    
@Generic: Only creating a single instance is not a synonym for an object being a singleton, nor is it an indication that a Singleton pattern is appropriate. – Adam Robinson Jun 11 '10 at 14:00
    
@Adam - OK, so take the word singleton out of the equation. My example is still much easier to manage and is the same as what you've provided, only my form variable is static and yours is contained within another form. Both our examples are perfectly valid, I just happen to think mine's cleaner. – GenericTypeTea Jun 11 '10 at 14:05
    
@Generic: While I wouldn't agree that yours is easier to manage (you now have another type that you have to manage whose logic--which is specific to a single other type--is in another location), it's certainly valid in the sense that it's functional and will solve the problem. I just argue that it's not the "right" way, for whatever that's worth. – Adam Robinson Jun 11 '10 at 14:08

You should create a singleton class for managing your form instances:

public class FormProvider
{
   public static UserForm UserForm
   {
       get
       {
          if (_userForm== null || _userForm.IsDisposed)
          {
            _userForm= new UserForm ();
          }
          return _userForm;
       }
   }
   private static UserForm _userForm;
}

NB, this is a very simple Singleton pattern. For the correct way to use the pattern, use this link.

You can then just access the form as follows:

FormProvider.UserForm.Show();
FormProvider.UserForm.MdiParent = this;

When FormProvider.UserForm is accessed for the FIRST time, it will be created. Any subsequent get on the FormProvider.UserForm property will return the form that was created on first access. This means that the form will only ever be created once.

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Adding a lock around the form instance is not adding any safety, only the illusion of it. A form is only permitted to be accessed from the thread that created it, and a thread must be an STA thread to create a form. Adding syncronization is arguably more dangerous than leaving it out, since it gives the impression to the user that you're actually doing the necessary work to make this multithread-compatible. In addition, this is not a scenario that calls for a Singleton. Finally, this will result in an error if the form is ever closed, as you'll access a disposed object. – Adam Robinson Jun 11 '10 at 13:58
    
Be extremely aware of memory leak when using a static form. Check out msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee658248.aspx to learn about handling events for a form. – Pierre-Alain Vigeant Jun 11 '10 at 13:59
    
@Adam - this will not cause an error if the form is closed. I've got 2/3 compact framework apps out there and there's never been an issue. Agree with you about the thread safety though, so I removed the snippet. – GenericTypeTea Jun 11 '10 at 14:02
    
@Generic: I'm not sure what the compact framework has to do with this particular scenario, but calling Show on a form (in winforms, as the question relates to) that has been closed will result in an ObjectDisposedException. – Adam Robinson Jun 11 '10 at 14:06
    
@Adam - Updated my snippet to take the ObjectDisposedException into consideration, thank you. – GenericTypeTea Jun 11 '10 at 14:13

If you know the name of the form :

    if (Application.OpenForms["FormName"] == null)
       {
           Form form = new Form();
           form.MdiParent = this;
           form.Show();
       }
       else
           Application.OpenForms["FormName"].Focus(); 
share|improve this answer

Options:

Typically, disabling the button works fine, and makes more sense from the user's perspective. Singleton works if you need the button enabled for something else.

Singleton is probably not a good solution if the form could be closed and a new instance will later be required.

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I would leave the button enabled, as that (in most applications I've seen) will either show the form or bring it to the front if it's already open. – Adam Robinson Jun 11 '10 at 13:59

You could always make the Form a Singleton:

public class MyForm : Form
{
    private MyForm _instance = null;
    private object _lock = new object();

    private MyForm() { }


    public static MyForm Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (_instance == null)
            {
                lock (_lock)
                {
                    if (_instance == null)
                    _instance = new MyForm();
                }
            }
            return _instance;
        }
    }
}

Then your call would look something like:

MyForm.Instance.Show();
MyForm.Instance.MdiParent = this;
share|improve this answer
    
fixed your code. You weren't returning anything and you hadn't added a get accessor. – GenericTypeTea Jun 11 '10 at 13:54
    
@GenericTypeTea - Heh. Got stuck in a fire drill and didn't get to edit the code. Thanks! – Justin Niessner Jun 11 '10 at 14:04

You could just examine the MdiChildren property of your host form to determine if an instance of your UserForm exists in it.

UserForm myForm = null;
foreach (Form existingForm in this.MdiChildren)
{
    myForm = existingForm as UserForm;
    if (myForm != null)
        break;
}

if (myForm == null)
{
    myForm = new UserForm();
    myForm.MdiParent = this;

    myForm.Show();
}
else
    myForm.Activate();

This will create a new instance of your UserForm is it doesn't already exist, and it will switch to the created instance if it does exist.

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This is my solution in ShowForm() and calling sample in aboutToolStripMenuItem_Click():

    private void ShowForm(Type typeofForm, string sCaption)
    {
        Form fOpen = GetOpenForm(typeofForm);
        Form fNew = fOpen;
        if (fNew == null)
            fNew = (Form)CreateNewInstanceOfType(typeofForm);
        else
            if (fNew.IsDisposed)
                fNew = (Form)CreateNewInstanceOfType(typeofForm);

        if (fOpen == null)
        {
            fNew.Text = sCaption;
            fNew.ControlBox = true;
            fNew.FormBorderStyle = System.Windows.Forms.FormBorderStyle.FixedSingle;
            fNew.MaximizeBox = false;
            fNew.MinimizeBox = false;
            // for MdiParent
            //if (f1.MdiParent == null)
            //    f1.MdiParent = CProject.mFMain;
            fNew.StartPosition = FormStartPosition.Manual;
            fNew.Left = 0;
            fNew.Top = 0;
            ShowMsg("Ready");
        }
        fNew.Show();
        fNew.Focus();
    }
    private void aboutToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        ShowForm(typeof(FAboutBox), "About");
    }

    private Form GetOpenForm(Type typeofForm)
    {
        FormCollection fc = Application.OpenForms;
        foreach (Form f1 in fc)
            if (f1.GetType() == typeofForm)
                return f1;

        return null;
    }
    private object CreateNewInstanceOfType(Type typeofAny)
    {
        return Activator.CreateInstance(typeofAny);
    }

    public void ShowMsg(string sMsg)
    {
        lblStatus.Text = sMsg;
        if (lblStatus.ForeColor != SystemColors.ControlText)
            lblStatus.ForeColor = SystemColors.ControlText;
    }
    public void ShowError(string sMsg)
    {
        lblStatus.Text = sMsg;
        if (lblStatus.ForeColor != Color.Red)
            lblStatus.ForeColor = Color.Red;
    }
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