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I would like to override bool's TryParse method to accept "yes" and "no." I know the method I want to use (below) but I don't know how to override bool's method.

... bool TryParse(string value, out bool result)
{
    if (value == "yes")
    {
        result = true;
        return true;
    }
    else if (value == "no")
    {
        result = false;
        return true;
    }
    else
    {
        return bool.TryParse(value, result);
    }
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can't override a static method. You could however create an extension method.

public static bool TryParse(this string value, out bool result)
{
    // For a case-insensitive compare, I recommend using
    // "yes".Equals(value, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase); 
    if (value == "yes")
    {
        result = true;
        return true;
    }
    if (value == "no")
    {
        result = false;
        return true;
    }

    return bool.TryParse(value, out result);
}

Put this in a static class, and call your code like this:

string a = "yes";
bool isTrue;
bool canParse = a.TryParse(out isTrue);
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2  
Personally, I like my Parse methods to return Nullable<>, where the return value is null if the string can't be parsed. This eliminates the need for an out parameter, and makes for nice calling syntax. e.g. bool a = "blah".ParseBool() ?? false; –  Greg Jun 11 '10 at 14:54
    
Nullables are indeed handy for parsing, but I was trying to override the existing TryParse method. Now that I'm writing my own, tho, I'll probably do something like that. Also, I am using StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase but didn't put it in my example just to make it look cleaner. Finally, why would you label your method 'TryParseBoolean' when your out type is a bool? (Though I suppose if you switched to Nullables, you'd need that naming.) –  dlras2 Jun 11 '10 at 14:59
    
@cyclotis04 - Good call. Because of the out parameter, the name TryParse would indeed be sufficient. –  Greg Jun 11 '10 at 15:09
2  
I might have upvoted this, but I see absolutely no sense in creating an extension method (especially on a class as commonly-used as System.String) when a simple static method would suffice. It's highly disturbing that everyone else seemed to have the same idea too; there seems to be an ongoing obsession with using extension methods in inappropriate places. –  Aaronaught Jun 11 '10 at 15:16
2  
What's less simple about an extension method? Where would you put a static method? The problem I have with static methods is it leads to classes with no purpose other than to hold helper methods which should have been extension methods in the first place. –  dlras2 Jun 11 '10 at 15:22

TryParse is a static method. You can't override a static method.

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Would the best way to do this just be with a helper function of my own, then? –  dlras2 Jun 11 '10 at 14:41
    
Write your own extension method for the string type. –  jsmith Jun 11 '10 at 14:42

TryParse is a static method and you can't override static methods.

You could always try to create an extension method for strings to do what you want:

public static bool ParseYesNo(this string str, out bool val)
{
    if(str.ToLowerInvariant() == "yes")
    {
        val = true;
        return true;
    }
    else if (str.ToLowerInvariant() == "no")
    {
        val = false;
        return true;
    }

    return bool.TryParse(str, out val);
}
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+1 Prefer this as dosn't use out value - just returns result –  David Relihan Jun 11 '10 at 14:50
    
The problem with this is I'm trying to know if the string is valid boolean - true, false, yes, no, 1, 0. "No" is valid boolean, though it returns false. –  dlras2 Jun 11 '10 at 15:10
    
@cyclotis04 - I updated my answer to better meet your requirements. The extension method now behaves more like bool.TryParse(). Personally, I'm not a big fan out parameters though. –  Justin Niessner Jun 11 '10 at 15:48

You cannot override TryParse. However, you could create an extension method on string for convenience.

public static class StringExtension
{
    public static bool TryParseToBoolean(this string value, bool acceptYesNo, out bool result)
    {
        if (acceptYesNo)
        {
            string upper = value.ToUpper();
            if (upper == "YES")
            {
                result = true;
                return true;
            }
            if (upper == "NO")
            {
                result = false;
                return true;
            }
        }
        return bool.TryParse(value, out result);
    }
}

And then it would be used like so:

public static class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        bool result;
        string value = "yes";
        if (value.TryParseToBoolean(true, out result))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("good input");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("bad input");
        }
    }
}
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Apparently I'm not the only one to suggest this. –  Brian Gideon Jun 11 '10 at 14:53

This is not possible.

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