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I have compared gcc assembler output of

do{ 

//some code 

}while(0);

with

do{

//some code

 break; 
}while(1);

The output is equal, with or without optimization but..

It's always that way?

No experiment can prove theories, they can only show they are wrong

And because (I hope) programming is not an experimental science, and results can be predicted (at least simple things) I want to be sure next time I reeplace a break;}while(1); for the clearer (and less risky) while(0);

Thank you for reading

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14  
Why are you putting code into a while loop that doesn't loop? –  jjnguy Jun 11 '10 at 14:50
3  
The logic may be that under certain conditions a "continue" will be called, looping again. –  sunside Jun 11 '10 at 14:53
2  
It is a replacement for using goto's: break on exit-conditions. When refactoring, it pays to use extra functions instead and return when needed. –  stefaanv Jun 11 '10 at 14:56
3  
Then, if continue is called in the loop, the behavior will be different. (@Markus, @jmucchiello) –  jjnguy Jun 11 '10 at 15:00
4  
do { } while (0) is a common idiom for writing Macros. It produces more compile errors than the alternatives, when used improperly... as for the while (1) with break... I have no idea why that would be useful. –  Stephen Jun 11 '10 at 15:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 17 down vote accepted

There is a slight difference:

do {
  // code
  if ( condition )
    continue;
  // code
  break;
} while(1);

Will restart the loop when condition is true, whereas in the } while(0); version, the continue will be equivalent to break.

If no continue is present, then they should produce exactly the same code.

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1  
Maybe they won't produce the same code, but they should do about the same thing. –  zneak Jun 11 '10 at 15:07
2  
This answer is correct. –  jjnguy Jun 11 '10 at 15:08
1  
Yes this answer is correct –  Hernán Eche Jun 11 '10 at 15:19
    
can be always changed into something like: do { /*code*/ } while(condition); /*code*/ at least, that specific example –  ShinTakezou Jun 11 '10 at 15:45
    
@ShinTakezou Yes; the only practical reason might to use multiple conditions, and/or interlaced breaks. –  Gianni Jun 11 '10 at 16:39

The forms are not equivalent. This is an infinite loop:

do {
    continue;
    break;
} while (1);

This isn't:

do {
    continue;
} while (0);
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Edit: Upon reading various comments on the matter, I will admit that this answer is wrong. Sorry.

Instead of:

do{ 

//some code 

}while(0);

or:

do{

//some code

 break; 
}while(1);

I would just use:

//some code

I'm not 100% sure if you can do this in c++, but if you want to limit the scope of variables, and that is why you are doing this, just use curly braces by themselves:

{

 // Some Code

}
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What if you want to break or continue? –  jmucchiello Jun 11 '10 at 14:58
6  
@jmucchiello: Use a goto. No seriously. Using a fake loop so that you can disguise a goto as some other word is more evil than using goto in the first place. (IMHO) –  Charles Bailey Jun 11 '10 at 15:00
1  
@Hernan If that is the case, then I think you should be using if/else blocks to achieve this. Or, even better, put the code into a method and use return to break out of the code early. Using a loop to do the job of if/else blocks seems broken to me. –  jjnguy Jun 11 '10 at 15:03
1  
@Charles, The loop construct is being used for different reasons that what I thought when I first answered. It now makes perfect sense why someone would want to do this. (But, i still don't think it's a good idea) –  jjnguy Jun 11 '10 at 15:12
1  
@jinguy: The main use I've seen for do { ... } while 0 is in macros, since it allows you to write a single statement that contains multiples. A block is not quite equivalent to a single statement, since { ... }; is two statements while do { ... } while 0; is one (and that can matter: consider if (foo) bar(); else baz;). This is mostly applicable in C, because C++ has better ways to write function-type macros. –  David Thornley Jun 11 '10 at 15:16

Markus' comment pointed me to this answer: the difference is when using continue keyword.

In this case:

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    int i = 0;
    do {
        ++i;
        _tprintf(_T("Iteration %d\n"), i);
        if (i < 30) continue;
    } while(0);

    return 0;
}

you get only one iteration, while in this case:

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    int i = 0;
    do {
        ++i;
        _tprintf(_T("Iteration %d\n"), i);
        if (i < 30) continue;
        break;
    } while(1);

    return 0;
}

you get 30 iterations. Tested under VS2008.

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Karasu: I had to read this stackoverflow.com/questions/895827/… to understand your code =P, yes that's the difference –  Hernán Eche Jun 11 '10 at 16:03
    
@Hernán Eche: Sorry for the inconvenience. I use Microsoft's VS2008 for all my work :) –  Aoi Karasu Jun 11 '10 at 16:23

The do while clauses are logically equivalent. If they are translated to the same byte code depends on the compiler at hand. I guess that most modern compilers will treat them equally.

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EDIT based on your comment that you're using a while with breaks in order to be able to break out of the 'loop' when certain conditions have been met.

If this is what you're trying to accomplish:

do
{ 
  // processing step 1
  if( some_condition )
    break;
  // processing step 2
  if( some_condition )
    break;
  // etcetera..
} while(0)

...then just break the code you have in your while loop out to a stand-alone function with multiple returns:

void processing()
{

  // processing step 1
  if( some_condition )
    return;
  // processing step 2
  if( some_condition )
    return;
  // etcetera..
}

int main()
{
  // ...
  processing();
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
-1: making assumptions. do whiles can be used to exit early from a chain of functions calls (setup for instance) without an if/else ladder. –  Gregor Brandt Jun 11 '10 at 15:05
    
@gbrandt: Look again. It was completely unclear what the OP wanted until the "assumptions" were pointed out to the OP. –  John Dibling Jun 11 '10 at 15:07
    
removed -1 on rewording of answer. –  Gregor Brandt Jun 11 '10 at 17:14

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