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I have defined some constants eg:

define('DB_HOSTNAME', 'localhost', true);
define('DB_USERNAME', 'root', true);
define('DB_PASSWORD', 'root', true);
define('DB_DATABASE', 'authtest', true);

now when I try to do this:

class Auth{
function AuthClass() {
$this->db_link = mysql_connect(DB_HOSTNAME, DB_USERNAME, DB_PASSWORD) 
or die(mysql_error());
}
}

I get an error. Why is this and what do I need to do?

See, I've tried using (for example) global DB_HOSTNAME but this fails with an error.

EDIT

the error I am getting is Unknown MySQL server host 'DB_HOSTNAME' (1)

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If you're getting that error, the define definitely isn't defined when the method is invoked. –  Artefacto Jun 11 '10 at 15:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

When the script runs, both the constant and the class definitions should be included.

e.g.

constants.php.inc

define('DB_HOSTNAME', 'localhost', true);
define('DB_USERNAME', 'root', true);
define('DB_PASSWORD', 'root', true);
define('DB_DATABASE', 'authtest', true);

Auth.php.inc

class Auth{
    function AuthClass() {
        $this->db_link = mysql_connect(DB_HOSTNAME, DB_USERNAME, DB_PASSWORD) 
           or die(mysql_error());
    }
}

script.php

include "constants.php.inc";
include "Auth.php.inc";

//do stuff
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Umm. That really doesn't do anything to address the issue since classes do not recognize variables set outside the scope of the class. All this does is reorganize the information with exactly the same result. –  Joseph Jun 11 '10 at 15:22
1  
@Joseph Constants aren't variables, and they are indeed recognized inside any function/method that is executed after they are defined. This is a valid answer and may indeed answer the question. –  meagar Jun 11 '10 at 15:26
    
the above answer is the problem I have –  Ash Jun 11 '10 at 15:27
    
@Ashley Ward see here codepad.viper-7.com/WcDT6R As you can see, you can access defined define's inside a class. –  Artefacto Jun 11 '10 at 15:33
    
You are correct and I am humbled. There must be other errors with my code. –  Ash Jun 11 '10 at 15:35

It should work as long as you've defined the constants before AuthClass() runs. If they are not in the same file as your Auth class, you will first need to include them within the file that Auth resides in so it can see them:

include("the_file_that_has_those_constants_in_it.php");

Then it should just work. Constants are already global so there is no need to use the global keyword.

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It sounds like your constants aren't being defined before you instantiate class Auth. When you use an undefined constant this way, PHP will issue a warning and convert it to a string. If the problem is indeed that your constants aren't defined, your code will effectively be interpreted as:

$this->db_link = mysql_connect('DB_HOSTNAME', 'DB_USERNAME', 'DB_PASSWORD');

Given the error you're getting (Unknown MySQL server host 'DB_HOSTNAME'), I'm assuming this is what's happening.

As other answers state, make sure you're defining the constants before you attempt to call Auth::AuthClass. If the class and the DB_* constants are defined in different files, make sure that both files are included before you attempt to instantiate/use class Auth.


As an aside, defined constants are not variables. You cannot use global CONSTANT_NAME; in this way, and you do not need to - all constants are always global, and available everywhere after the point they're defined. A simple test proves this:

define ('MY_CONST', 3);

class Test {
    function __construct() { echo MY_CONST; }
}

$x = new Test(); // outputs 3
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