Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The Challenge

The shortest code by character count that takes a single input integer N (N >= 3) and returns an array of indices that when iterated would traverse an NxN matrix according to the JPEG "zigzag" scan pattern. The following is an example traversal over an 8x8 matrixsrc:

zigzag layout pattern

Examples

(The middle matrix is not part of the input or output, just a representation of the NxN matrix the input represents.)

                1 2 3
(Input) 3  -->  4 5 6  -->  1 2 4 7 5 3 6 8 9 (Output)
                7 8 9

                1  2  3  4
(Input) 4  -->  5  6  7  8  -->  1 2 5 9 6 3 4 7 10 13 14 11 8 12 15 16 (Output)
                9 10 11 12
               13 14 15 16

Notes

  • The resulting array's base should be appropriate for your language (e.g., Matlab arrays are 1-based, C++ arrays are 0-based).
  • This is related to this question.

Bonus

Extend your answer to take two inputs N and M (N, M >=3) and perform the same scan over an NxM matrix. (In this case N would be the number of columns and M the number of rows.)

Bonus Examples

                  1  2  3  4
(Input) 4 3  -->  5  6  7  8  -->  1 2 5 9 6 3 4 7 10 11 8 12 (Output)
                  9 10 11 12

                   1  2  3
(Input) 3 4  -->   4  5  6  -->  1 2 4 7 5 3 6 8 10 11 9 12 (Output)
                   7  8  9
                  10 11 12
share|improve this question
1  
I'll start the J pool with... under 7 characters. –  Mark Rushakoff Jun 11 '10 at 22:38
    
@Mark: The best I have so far is 15. I'm pretty sure 7 isn't possible for this question, but I'd love to be proven wrong. –  David Jun 12 '10 at 5:19
1  
why is it i spend a day of coding then i spend 3 more hours doing code golf? =P –  Claudiu Jun 13 '10 at 1:21

10 Answers 10

up vote 16 down vote accepted

J, 13 15 characters

;<@|.`</.i.2$

Usage:

   ;<@|.`</.i.2$  3
0 1 3 6 4 2 5 7 8

   ;<@|.`</.i.2$  4
0 1 4 8 5 2 3 6 9 12 13 10 7 11 14 15

Explanation

(NB. is J's comment indicator)

;         NB. Link together...
<@|.`<    NB. ... 'take the reverse of' and 'take normally'
/.        NB. ... applied to alternating diagonals of...
i.        NB. ... successive integers starting at 0 and counting up to fill an array with dimensions of...
2$        NB. ... the input extended cyclically to a list of length two.

J, bonus, 13 characters

;<@|.`</.i.|.

Usage:

   ;<@|.`</.i.|. 3 4
0 1 3 6 4 2 5 7 9 10 8 11

   ;<@|.`</.i.|. 9 6
0 1 9 18 10 2 3 11 19 27 36 28 20 12 4 5 13 21 29 37 45 46 38 30 22 14 6 7 15 23 31 39 47 48 40 32 24 16 8 17 25 33 41 49 50 42 34 26 35 43 51 52 44 53
share|improve this answer
13  
that's just insane.. –  Blindy Jun 12 '10 at 5:21
6  
I like how it takes two characters to do 'applied to alternating diagonals of'. –  Cam Jun 12 '10 at 18:15
    
yea the 'alternating diagonal' built-in is what makes this possible. im workin on a goflscript solution which doesnt use that.. will see how short it can be –  Claudiu Jun 12 '10 at 23:11

Python, 92, 95, 110, 111, 114, 120, 122, 162, 164 chars

N=input()
for a in sorted((p%N+p/N,(p%N,p/N)[(p%N-p/N)%2],p)for p in range(N*N)):print a[2],

Testing:

$ echo 3 | python ./code-golf.py 
0 1 3 6 4 2 5 7 8

$ echo 4 | python ./code-golf.py 
0 1 4 8 5 2 3 6 9 12 13 10 7 11 14 15

This solution easily generalizes for NxM boards: tweak the input processing and replace N*N with N*M:

N,M=map(int,raw_input().split())
for a in sorted((p%N+p/N,(p%N,p/N)[(p%N-p/N)%2],p)for p in range(N*M)):print a[2],

I suspect there's some easier/shorter way to read two numbers.

Testing:

$ echo 4 3 | python ./code-golf.py 
0 1 4 8 5 2 3 6 9 10 7 11
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not familiar with Python syntax, but how does this print the numbers separated by a space? –  Dogbert Jun 11 '10 at 22:44
    
@Adam the comma does that, also "A '\n' character is written at the end, unless the print statement ends with a comma" –  nevets1219 Jun 11 '10 at 23:00
    
You can use 'split()' rather than 'replace()' –  David Jun 12 '10 at 5:54
    
@David: No he can't. He'll be left with an array of two strings. He needs an array of two ints, so that's why he's using eval + replace. You could just use split and then cast each array element to an int, but I think that'll end up using more characters. –  Wallacoloo Jun 13 '10 at 1:09
1  
@wallacoloo: how about N,M=input() (python 2.x)? –  Nas Banov Jun 13 '10 at 4:30

Ruby, 69 89 chars

n=gets.to_i
puts (0...n*n).sort_by{|p|[t=p%n+p/n,[p%n,p/n][t%2]]}*' '

89 chars

n=gets.to_i
puts (0...n*n).map{|p|[t=p%n+p/n,[p%n,p/n][t%2],p]}.sort.map{|i|i[2]}.join' '

Run

> zigzag.rb
3
0 1 3 6 4 2 5 7 8

> zigzag.rb
4
0 1 4 8 5 2 3 6 9 12 13 10 7 11 14 15

Credits to doublep for the sort method.

share|improve this answer
    
n=eval *$<;p (0...n*n).sort_by{|p|[t=p%n+p/n,[p%n,p/n][t%2]]} 61 –  matyr Jun 12 '10 at 3:33
    
@matyr: p prints [0, 1, 3,...] instead of 0 1 3.... –  J.F. Sebastian Jun 12 '10 at 6:22
    
@matyr, thanks for that. made it 69. eval *$< didn't work on my system. –  Dogbert Jun 12 '10 at 7:12
    
@Sebastian "an array of indices" doesn't indicate space-separated. @Adam puts -> $><<. –  matyr Jun 12 '10 at 19:37

F#, 126 chars

let n=stdin.ReadLine()|>int
for i=0 to 2*n do for j in[id;List.rev].[i%2][0..i]do if i-j<n&&j<n then(i-j)*n+j|>printf"%d "

Examples:

$ echo 3 | fsi --exec Program.fsx
0 1 3 6 4 2 5 7 8

$ echo 4 | fsi --exec Program.fsx
0 1 4 8 5 2 3 6 9 12 13 10 7 11 14 15
share|improve this answer
3  
[x;y].[i%2] rather than if i%2=0 then x else y - nice, gotta remember that one - props to @doublep –  Brian Jun 11 '10 at 21:15
    
Oooh, that's a nice trick. I think that one might work in PowerShell as well. –  Joey Jun 11 '10 at 21:47

Golfscript, 26/30 32/36 45 59 characters

Shortest non-J solution so far:

Updated sort (don't tell the others!) - 30 chars:

 ~:1.*,{..1/\1%+.2%.+(@*]}$' '* #solution 1
#~:\.*,{.\/1$\%+.1&@.~if]}$' '* #solution 2
#~\:1*,{..1/\1%+.2%.+(@*]}$' '* #(bonus)
#~\:\*,{.\/1$\%+.1&@.~if]}$' '* #(bonus)

Straight implementation - 36 chars:

 ~:@.*,{[.@%:|\@/:^+|^- 2%^|if]}$' '*
#~\:@*,{[.@%:|\@/:^+|^- 2%^|if]}$' '* #(bonus)

If you can provide output as "013642578" instead of "0 1 3 6 4 2 5 7 8", then you can remove the last 4 characters.

Credit to doublep for the sorting technique.


Explanation:

~\:@*        #read input, store first number into @, multiply the two
,            #put range(@^2) on the stack
{...}$       #sort array using the key in ...
" "*         #join array w/ spaces

and for the key:

[            #put into an array whatever is left on the stack until ]
.@%:|        #store @%n on the stack, also save it as |
\@/:^        #store @/n on the stack, also save it as ^
+            #add them together. this remains on the stack.
|^- 2%^|if   #if (| - ^) % 2 == 1, then put ^ on stack, else put | on stack.
]            #collect them into an array
share|improve this answer
    
@editor: ah nice way of removing spaces =) –  Claudiu Jun 13 '10 at 0:40
    
@Nabb: you sure the updated sort works? i tried it but it gives different output –  Claudiu Jun 13 '10 at 1:27
    
output is exactly the same for both the square and bonus problems for the values I tested –  Nabb Jun 13 '10 at 2:28
    
Not familiar with Golfscript, but (a+b)%2 is equal to (a-b)%2. You might be able to %2 the sum of | and ^ if it helps saving some characters. –  Dogbert Jun 13 '10 at 6:59

MATLAB, 101/116 chars

Its basically a condensed version of the same answer given here, to be run directly on the command prompt:

N=input('');i=fliplr(spdiags(fliplr(reshape(1:N*N,N,N)')));i(:,1:2:end)=flipud(i(:,1:2:end));i(i~=0)'

and an extended one that read two values from the user:

S=str2num(input('','s'));i=fliplr(spdiags(fliplr(reshape(1:prod(S),S)')));i(:,1:2:end)=flipud(i(:,1:2:end));i(i~=0)'

Testing:

3
ans =
     1     2     4     7     5     3     6     8     9

and

4 3
ans =
     1     2     5     9     6     3     4     7    10    11     8    12
share|improve this answer

Ruby 137 130 138 characters

n=gets.to_i
def g(a,b,r,t,s);x=[s*r]*t;t==r ?[a,x,a]:[a,x,g(b,a,r,t+1,-s),x,a];end
q=0;puts ([1]+g(1,n,n-1,1,1)).flatten.map{|s|q+=s}*' '

$ zz.rb
3
1 2 4 7 5 3 6 8 9

$ zz.rb
4
1 2 5 9 6 3 4 7 10 13 14 11 8 12 15 16
share|improve this answer
    
You should use puts [array]*' ' to match the output in the question. –  Dogbert Jun 12 '10 at 7:14

C89 (280 bytes)

I guess this can still be optimized - I use four arrays to store the possible movement vectors when hitting a wall. I guess it can be done, saving some chars at the definition, but I think it will cost more to implement the logic further down. Anyway, here you go:

t,l,b,r,i,v,n;main(int c,char**a){n=atoi(*++a);b=n%2;int T[]={n-1,1},L[]={1-n,n}
,B[]={1-n,1},R[]={n-1,n};for(c=n*n;c--;){printf("%d%c",i,c?32:10);if(i>=n*(n-1))
v=B[b=!b];else if(i%n>n-2){if(!(n%2)&&i<n)goto g;v=R[r=!r];}else if(i<n)g:v=T[t=
!t];else if(!(i%n))v=L[l=!l];i+=v;}}

compiles with a few warnings, but as far as I know it is portable C89. I'm actually not sure whether my algorithm is clever at all, maybe you can get way shorter with a better one (haven't taken the time to understand the other solutions yet).

share|improve this answer

Haskell 117 characters

i s=concatMap(\q->d q++(reverse.d$q+1))[0,2..s+s]
 where d r=[x+s*(r-x)|x<-[0..r],x<s&&(r-x)<s]
main=readLn>>=print.i

Runs:

$ echo 3 | ./Diagonals 
[0,1,3,6,4,2,5,7,8]

$ echo 4 | ./Diagonals 
[0,1,4,8,5,2,3,6,9,12,13,10,7,11,14,15]

The rectangular variant is a little longer, at 120 characters:

j(w,h)=concatMap(\q->d q++(reverse.d$q+1))[0,2..w+h]
 where d r=[x+w*(r-x)|x<-[0..r],x<w&&(r-x)<h]
main=readLn>>=print.j

Input here requires a tuple:

$ echo '(4,3)' | ./Diagonals 
[0,1,4,8,5,2,3,6,9,10,7,11]

$ echo '(3,4)' | ./Diagonals 
[0,1,3,6,4,2,5,7,9,10,8,11]

Answers are all 0-based, and returned as lists (natural forms for Haskell).

share|improve this answer

Perl 102 characters

<>=~/ /;print map{$_%1e6," "}sort map{($x=($%=$_%$`)+($/=int$_/$`))*1e9+($x%2?$/:$%)*1e6+$_}0..$'*$`-1

usage :

echo 3 4 | perl zigzag.pl
0 1 3 6 4 2 5 7 9 10 8 11
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.