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If it's harder to explain using words, let's look at an example I have a generic function like this

void FunctionA<T>() where T : Form, new()
{
}

If I have a reflected type, how do I use it with the above function? I'm looking forward to do this

Type a = Type.GetType("System.Windows.Forms.Form");
FunctionA<a>();

Of cause the above method doesn't work.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can't. Generics in .NET must be resolved at compile time. You're trying to do something that would resolve them at runtime.

The only thing you can do is to provide an overload for FunctionA that takes a type object.


Hmmm... he's a dick, but he's right.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var t = typeof(Foo);
        var m = t.GetMethod("Bar");
        var hurr = m.MakeGenericMethod(typeof(string));
        var foo = new Foo();
        hurr.Invoke(foo, new string[]{"lol"});
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

public class Foo
{
    public void Bar<T>(T instance)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("called " + instance);
    }
}

MakeGenericMethod.

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How can .NET get so close to the power of a 1958 technology and yet still be so far away? –  Bryan Anderson Nov 25 '08 at 21:36
    
.NET is mainstream, Lisp (I assume that's what your reference is to) is not. That may answer the "why" question. –  Pavel Minaev Dec 1 '09 at 21:36
5  
That's one very definitive answer. Too bad it's incorrect. You can, through reflection, invoke generic methods using generic arguments resolved at runtime. It's not always desired, and one may wonder why he has to do it before actually using it, but it's possible. –  Jb Evain Dec 1 '09 at 21:41
1  
I hate you, Jb. I hate you so much. –  Will Dec 2 '09 at 14:47
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int s = 38;


        var t = typeof(Foo);
        var m = t.GetMethod("Bar");
        var g = m.MakeGenericMethod(s.GetType());
        var foo = new Foo();
        g.Invoke(foo, null);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

public class Foo
{
    public void Bar<T>()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(typeof(T).ToString());
    }
}

it works dynamicaly and s can be of any type

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Thank you so much, I've been looking for a solution and this worked exactly as needed. –  edobry Oct 26 '12 at 17:30

A few years late and from a msdn blog, but this might help:

Type t = typeof(Customer);  
IList lst = (IList)Activator.CreateInstance((typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(t)));  
Console.WriteLine(lst.GetType().FullName); 
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