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I have a StringCollection object with 5 words in them. 3 of them are duplicate words. I am trying to create a LINQ query that will count how many unique words are in the collection and output them to to the console. So, for example, if my StringCollection has 'House', 'Car', 'House','Dog', 'Cat', then it should output like this:

House --> 2
Car --> 1
Dog --> 1
Cat --> 1

Any ideas on how to create a LINQ query to do this?

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How do you want to handle casing? –  Matthew Whited Jun 11 '10 at 22:13
    
Ignore Case. Cat and cat should be treated as the same word –  Icemanind Jun 11 '10 at 22:14
    
All your answers are great except I don't seem to have a .GroupBy method. Keep in mind that I am using a System.Collections.Specialized.StringCollection object to store the strings, not a string array. –  Icemanind Jun 11 '10 at 22:20
    
possible duplicate of c#: a method to count occurrences in a list –  nawfal Oct 17 '13 at 12:46

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try the following

var res = from word in col.Cast<string>()
          group word by word into g
          select new { Word = g.Key, Count = g.Count() };
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2  
+1 But this doesn't ignores case. –  Taylor Leese Jun 11 '10 at 22:19
    
I believe a simple change to group word by word.ToLower() will fix that, of course all your keys will then be in lowercase. –  Matt Greer Jun 11 '10 at 22:21
    
To be fair his answer was probably written before that was added. –  Matthew Whited Jun 11 '10 at 22:22
    
When I try this, I get an error. Keep in mind that I am using a System.Collections.Specialized.StringCollection object to store the strings, not a string array –  Icemanind Jun 11 '10 at 22:22
    
@icemanind: I edited my answer to handle both of these criteria for you... –  Reed Copsey Jun 11 '10 at 22:24
var xs = new StringCollection { "House", "Car", "House", "Dog", "Cat" };

foreach (var g in xs.Cast<string>()
                    .GroupBy(x => x, StringComparer.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", g.Key, g.Count());
}
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Given that you are using StringCollection and want to ignore case, you'll need to use Enumerable.GroupBy with Enumerable.Cast:

var results = collection.Cast<string>.GroupBy(
        i => i,
        (word, words) => new { Word = word, Count = words.Count() },
        StringComparer.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase
    );

foreach(var wordPair in results)
     Console.WriteLine("Word: \"{0}\" - Count: {1}", wordPair.Word, wordPair.Count);
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To build a single string value result...

var stringCollection = new[] { "House", "Car", "house", "Dog", "Cat" };
var result = stringCollection.Cast<string>().GroupBy(
                                  k => k, 
                                  StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase)
                             .Select(v => v.Key + " -->" + v.Count())
                             .Aggregate((l,r)=>l+" " + r);
//result = "House -->2 Car -->1 Dog -->1 Cat -->1"

To put each value on a different line...

var stringCollection = new[] { "House", "Car", "house", "Dog", "Cat" };
var result = stringCollection.Cast<string>().GroupBy(
                                  k => k, 
                                  StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);

foreach (var value in result)
    Console.WriteLine("{0} --> {1}", value.Key, value.Count());
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.Cast<string>() added to work with StringCollection –  Matthew Whited Jun 11 '10 at 22:26
foreach(var g in input.GroupBy(i => i.ToLower()).Select(i => new {Word = i.Key, Count = i.Count()})
{
  Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} -> {1}", g.Word, g.Count));
}
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No! Using ToLower for case-insensitive string comparison == facefalm.jpg –  dtb Jun 11 '10 at 22:18

It should be as simple as:

Console.WriteLine(stringCollection.Distinct().Count());
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1  
That will show the unique strings, but not the count of duplicated ones. –  Ray Hayes Jun 11 '10 at 22:18
1  
This will count the number of unique strings. so it would return 4 –  Matthew Whited Jun 11 '10 at 22:24
    
@Ray & @Matthew: Yes, the OP asked how to count how many unique words there are. Now that the example has been formatted, I realise that this is not what the OP intended to ask for... –  Guffa Jun 11 '10 at 22:34
var query =    
  from s in Collection  
  group s by s.Description into g  
  select new {word = g.Key, num = g.Count()};
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