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Is there a difference between Cursor.Current and this.Cursor (where this is a WinForm) in .Net? I've always used this.Cursor and have had very good luck with it but I've recently started using CodeRush and just embedded some code in a "Wait Cursor" block and CodeRush used the Cursor.Current property. I've seen on the Internet and at work where other programmers have had some problems with the Cursor.Current property. It just got me to wondering if there is a difference in the two. Thanks in advance.

I did a little test. I have two winforms. I click a button on form1, set the Cursor.Current property to Cursors.WaitCursor and then show form2. The cursor doesn't change on either form. It remains Cursors.Default (pointer) cursor.

If I set this.Cursor to Cursors.WaitCursor in the button click event on form1 and show form2, the wait cursor only shows on form1 and the default cursor is on form2 which is expected. So, I still don't know what Cursor.Current does.

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4 Answers

up vote 56 down vote accepted

Windows sends the window that contains the mouse cursor the WM_SETCURSOR message, giving it an opportunity to change the cursor shape. A control like TextBox takes advantage of that, changing the cursor into a I-bar. The Control.Cursor property determines what shape will be used.

The Cursor.Current property changes the shape directly, without waiting for a WM_SETCURSOR response. In most cases, that shape is unlikely to survive for long. As soon as the user moves the mouse, WM_SETCURSOR changes it back to Control.Cursor.

The UseWaitCursor property was added in .NET 2.0 to make it easier to display an hourglass. Unfortunately, it doesn't work very well. It requires a WM_SETCURSOR message to change the shape and that won't happen when you set the property to true and then do something that takes a while. Try this code for example:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
  this.UseWaitCursor = true;
  System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(3000);
  this.UseWaitCursor = false;
}

The cursor never changes. To whack that into shape, you'll need to use Cursor.Current as well. Here is a little helper class to make it easy:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;

public class HourGlass : IDisposable {
  public HourGlass() {
    Enabled = true;
  }
  public void Dispose() {
    Enabled = false;
  }
  public static bool Enabled {
    get { return Application.UseWaitCursor; }
    set {
      if (value == Application.UseWaitCursor) return;
      Application.UseWaitCursor = value;
      Form f = Form.ActiveForm;
      if (f != null && f.Handle != IntPtr.Zero)   // Send WM_SETCURSOR
        SendMessage(f.Handle, 0x20, f.Handle, (IntPtr)1);
    }
  }
  [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("user32.dll")]
  private static extern IntPtr SendMessage(IntPtr hWnd, int msg, IntPtr wp, IntPtr lp);
}

And use it like this:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
  using (new HourGlass()) {
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(3000);
  }
}
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I ran into a case when combining this with a splash screen that would cause an InvalidOperationException - "Cross-thread operation not valid". Adding a !f.InvokeRequired between f!=null and f.Handle!=null resolved the issue. –  Daniel Ballinger Feb 14 '11 at 2:17
    
This works great for me, but according to ReSharper, "Expression is always true" on this line: if (f != null && f.Handle != null) // Send WM_SETCURSOR –  B. Clay Shannon Jul 3 '12 at 17:37
    
This is an AWESOME helper class. Worked when nothing else did. –  KeithS Aug 25 '12 at 1:44
    
When setting UseWaitCursor to false, the cursor is not updated until the user moves the mouse. You should add the following code to the end: Cursor.Position = Cursor.Position; // Refresh cursor –  arni Nov 17 '13 at 22:56
1  
If you can't get the cursor to update after the slow code finished running then you're doing it wrong. –  Hans Passant Nov 17 '13 at 22:57
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I believe that Cursor.Current is the mouse cursor currently being used (regardless of where it is on the screen), while this.Cursor is the cursor it will be set to, when the mouse passes over your window.

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This seems to be not true. I created a sample application to verify this and it seems that System.Windows.Cursors.Current is updated only when cursor change is associated with application window. –  Lukasz M Jun 24 '12 at 17:17
    
The difference is that this.Cursor is not updated even if cursor is over a child control of a window or over window's non-client area. Sorry for two subsequent comments, time allowed for editing the first one has ended. –  Lukasz M Jun 24 '12 at 17:29
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this.Cursor is the cursor that will be used when the mouse is over the window referred to by this. Cursor.Current is the current mouse cursor, which might be different from this.Cursor if the mouse is over a different window.

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Actually if you would like to use HourGlass from another thread that will give you back cross-threading exception because you are trying to access f.Handle from different thread than form was originally created. Use GetForegroundWindow() instead from user32.dll.

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
private static extern IntPtr GetForegroundWindow();

and then

public static bool Enabled
{
    get
    {
        return Application.UseWaitCursor;
    }

    set
    {
        if (value == Application.UseWaitCursor)
        {
            return;
        }

        Application.UseWaitCursor = value;
        var handle = GetForegroundWindow();
        SendMessage(handle, 0x20, handle, (IntPtr)1);
    }
}
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