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I am creating an app using the Bespin editor and HTML5's localStorage. It stores all files locally and helps with grammar, uses JSLint and some other parsers for CSS and HTML to aid the user.

I want to calculate how much of the localStorage limit has been used and how much there actually is. Is this possible today? I was thinking for not to simply calculate the bits that are stored. But then again I'm not sure what more is there that I can't measure myself.

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6 Answers 6

You may be able to get somewhat of an idea by using the JSON methods to turn the whole localStorage object to a JSON Object:

JSON.stringify(localStorage).length

I don't know how byte-accurate it would be, especially with the few bytes of added markup if you're using additional objects - but I figure it's better than thinking you're only pushing 28K and instead doing 280K (or vice-versa).

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3  
This is actually accurate enough to work with. With localStorage maxed out on Chrome 14, JSON.stringify(localStorage).length === 2636625 or 2.51448 MB, which is close enough (dev-test.nemikor.com/web-storage/support-test). Used in tandem with the try{} catch{}, and you've got enough to build a helper class. –  Christopher Jul 6 '11 at 22:44
2  
note that, as pointed out in the test you link, this is a size in characters and not in Bytes: "Strings in JavaScript are UTF-16, so each character requires two bytes of memory. This means that while many browsers have a 5 MB limit, you can only store 2.5 M characters." –  Mortimer Nov 11 '12 at 17:22
up vote 29 down vote accepted

I didn't find a universal way to get the remaining limit on the browsers I needed, but I did find out that when you do reach the limit there is an error message that pops up. This is of-course different in each browser.

To max it out I used this little script:

localStorage.setItem("DATA", "m");
for(i=0 ; i<40 ; i++) {
    var data = localStorage.getItem("DATA");
    try { 
        localStorage.setItem("DATA", data + data);
    } catch(e) {
        console.log("LIMIT REACHED: (" + i + ")");
        console.log(e);
    }
}
localStorage.removeItem("DATA");

From that I got this information:

Google Chrome

  • DOMException:
    • code: 22
    • message: "Failed to execute 'setItem' on 'Storage': Setting the value of 'data' exceeded the quota."
    • name: "QuotaExceededError"

Mozilla Firefox

  • DOMException:
    • code: 1014
    • message: "Persistent storage maximum size reached"
    • name: "NS_ERROR_DOM_QUOTA_REACHED"

Safari

  • Crashed (almost, took about 4 min to recover)

Internet Explorer (community)

  • Anyone wanna to try? (I'm on a Mac, no Windows)

My solution

So far my solution is to add an extra call each time the user would save anything. And if the exception is caught then I would tell them that they are running out of storage capacity.


Edit: Delete the added data

I forgot to mention that for this to actually work you would need to delete the DATA item that was set originally. The change is reflected above by using the removeItem() function.

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Very nice, what was the value of i when this was reached in each case? –  artlung Jun 24 '10 at 1:31
    
20-21 i think. You can run the test yourself if you want to. –  JeroenEijkhof Jun 24 '10 at 6:00
    
IE: ABORT_ERR: 20 code: 22 message: "QuotaExceededError" name: "QuotaExceededError" –  Rui Lima Nov 9 '12 at 21:43
    
in IE your code raises exception before space end: window.localStorage.remainingSpace : 805692 | window.localStorage.getItem("DATA").length : 4194304 | JSON.stringify(localStorage).length : 4194315 | i: 22 –  Rui Lima Nov 9 '12 at 21:46
    
has anyone tried this on Safari on iOS? –  Brad Jun 30 at 12:35

IE8 implements the remainingSpace property for this purpose:

alert(window.localStorage.remainingSpace);  // should return 5000000 when empty

Unfortunately it seems that this is not available in the other browsers. However I am not sure if they implement something similar.

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THanks! :D Hehe...thats fun for them. Unfortunately my apps currently are only tested in Safari, Chrome, Firefox. Thanks for the info :D –  JeroenEijkhof Jun 12 '10 at 1:57
1  
@WmasterJ: I'm seeing that the IE Team actually proposed for this (or something similar) to be included in the standard (back in 2008): markmail.org/thread/ugzdcamtyftcyk6y. –  Daniel Vassallo Jun 12 '10 at 1:59
27  
This time IE was right. It would seem obvious that this is needed. –  JeroenEijkhof Jun 12 '10 at 2:40
3  
can't belive that ie was finally right about something –  gion_13 Jul 18 '11 at 13:54
2  
@RuiLima, note that because characters in javascript use up two bytes instead of one, 5000000 characters actually takes up 10MB of space. Seems like IE may be reporting characters remaining, instead of bytes, or they changed their minds about the storage limit. –  Ishmael Smyrnow Nov 21 '13 at 20:07

To add to the browser test results:

Firefox i=22.

Safari Version 5.0.4 on my Mac didn't hang. Error as Chrome. i=21.

Opera Tells the user that the website wants to store data but doesn't have enough space. The user can reject the request, up the limit to the amount required or to several other limits, or set it to unlimited. Go to opera:webstorage to say whether this message appears or not. i=20. Error thrown is same as Chrome.

IE9 standards mode Error as Chrome. i=22.

IE9 in IE8 standards mode Console message "Error: Not enough storage is available to complete this operation". i=22

IE9 in older modes object error. i=22.

IE8 Don't have a copy to test, but local storage is supported (http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3452816/does-ie8-support-out-of-the-box-in-localstorage)

IE7 and below Doesn't support local storage.

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You can use the below line to accurately calculate this value and here is a jsfiddle for illustration of its use

alert(1024 * 1024 * 5 - unescape(encodeURIComponent(JSON.stringify(localStorage))).length);
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I'm using this algorithm to determine used space for a chrome extension, but I remember reading another SO question (forget which one, now) that JS uses UTF-16 strings instead of UTF-8, and as such, you have to double the number of bytes you get by doing string.length. Do you know if that's true? If so, I'll have to update my code... –  Adam Tuttle Mar 12 '13 at 12:24
1  
your jsfiddle doesn't load in my browser (mac/chrome). –  Justin Apr 19 '13 at 17:30
    
It looks like you broke JSFiddle, although you can still see the output here! –  c24w Jan 15 at 10:01

Ran into this today while testing (exceeding storage quota) and whipped up a solution. IMO, knowing what the limit is and where we are in relation is far less valuable than implementing a functional way to continue storing beyond the quota.

Thus, rather than trying to do size comparisons and capacity checks, lets react when we've hit the quota, reduce our current storage by a third, and resume storing. If said reduction fails, stop storing.

set: function( param, val ) { 
    try{
        localStorage.setItem( param, typeof value == 'object' ? JSON.stringify(value) : value )
        localStorage.setItem( 'lastStore', new Date().getTime() )
    }
    catch(e){
      if( e.code === 22 ){
        // we've hit our local storage limit! lets remove 1/3rd of the entries (hopefully chronologically)
        // and try again... If we fail to remove entries, lets silently give up
        console.log('Local storage capacity reached.')

        var maxLength = localStorage.length
          , reduceBy = ~~(maxLength / 3);

        for( var i = 0; i < reduceBy; i++ ){
          if( localStorage.key(0) ){
            localStorage.removeItem( localStorage.key(0) );
          }
          else break;
        }

        if( localStorage.length < maxLength ){
          console.log('Cache data reduced to fit new entries. (' + maxLength + ' => ' + localStorage.length + ')');
          public.set( param, value );
        }
        else {
          console.log('Could not reduce cache size. Removing session cache setting from this instance.');
          public.set = function(){}
        }
      }
    }
}

This function lives within a wrapper object, so public.set simply calls itself. Now we can add to storage and not worry what the quota is or how close we are too it. If a single store is exceeding 1/3rd the quota size is where this function will stop culling and quit storing, and at that point, you shouldn't be caching anyways, right?

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