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I have html like this.

<span class="gallery-open-item year-icon-Yes 2010">
<a href="/year/none">
</a>
</span>

I need to check using jQuery if span.gallery-open-item has year-icon-Yes class, and if so take the next (for this example is 2010) class and place it in the href attribute like this:

<a href="/year/2010"/>

All this I need in jQuery or JavaScript.

I have done some experiments but I can't take 2010 to normal javascript variable. Any ideas?

Sorry for my English.

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4  
To what end? My "there has to be a better way" sense is tingling. –  Richard JP Le Guen Jun 12 '10 at 16:50
    
One thing, classnames in CSS should not begin with a number, Can you instead start it with something else? Maybe y-2010 ? –  artlung Jun 12 '10 at 16:58
    
Yes there is no problem. I can start with y-. –  Tigran Tokmajyan Jun 12 '10 at 17:01
    
Homework assignment? –  Gert Grenander Jun 12 '10 at 17:15
    
jQuery homework? :)) –  Tigran Tokmajyan Jun 12 '10 at 17:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about this:

$('span.gallery-open-item.year-icon-Yes > a').each(function(i, elem) {
  $.each($(elem).parent().attr('class').split(' '), function(j, klass) {
    // NOTE: use /^y-([\d]*)$/ if years are prefixed with y-
    if (year = klass.match(/^([\d]*)$/))
      $(elem).attr('href', $(elem).attr('href').replace('none', year[1]));
  });
});

This would iterate over every A tag beneath your SPAN tags and fetch the classes from each parent, search these for a number and replace the "next" part.

Update: Added comments for the case you switch to prefixed years.

Update 2: Now tested and working (using Prototype usually *sigh*).

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Amended my code for the selector to find only direct descendents as parent() only looks up the direct ascendent. You may switch to closest("a") instead of parent() if other behaviour is intended. –  hurikhan77 Jun 12 '10 at 19:04

Here's another approach. Tested, working.

$('.gallery-open-item.year-icon-Yes').each(function(){
    that = this;
    var classes = $(this).attr('class').split(' ');
    $.each(classes, function(i, val) {
        if (val.match(/^y-/gi)) {
            $('a', that).attr('href', function(){
                return this.href.replace('none', val.split('-')[1]);
            });
        }
    });
});

Assumes this markup:

<span class="gallery-open-item year-icon-Yes y-2010">
<a href="/year/none/">
    Test
</a>
</span>
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You are using attr() to access 'href' for reading but not for writing (which may be unportable between browsers). –  hurikhan77 Jun 12 '10 at 17:59
    
hurikhan77, it is my understanding that the jQuery library does work under the hood to make calls to getAttribute for browsers which require it. Does that alay your concern? Take a look at the source: ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.2/jquery.js –  artlung Jun 12 '10 at 19:09
    
@art well not really as that's not the concern. My concern is about the this.href.replace() call which should consequently be $(this).attr('href').replace() –  hurikhan77 Jun 12 '10 at 19:34
    
"may be unportable between browsers" you say, what browsers? –  artlung Jun 12 '10 at 19:41
    
@art the word is "may", I cannot currently think of a browser. However, for consistency: Why use ` attr('href')` in one place and then ` .href` in another? –  hurikhan77 Jun 12 '10 at 22:46

Here's one way of doing it. First, we select the span tags that have both the classes gallery-open-item and year-icon-Yes. Then, for each of them we're going to get an array of classes that the span tag has. I loop over the class names, and check for the first one that is a number. Finally, modify the a tag inside the span to set the desired url.

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('span.gallery-open-item.year-icon-Yes').each(function() {
        var classNames = $(this).attr('class').split(' ');
        for (var i = 0; i < classNames.length; i++)
        {
            if (!isNaN(classNames[i]))
            {
                var year = classNames[i];
                $(this).find('a').attr('href', '/year/'+year);
                break;
            }
        }
    });
});

Edit: Based on the comments that class names should not start with a number, it's pretty easy to make this work for class names of the form y-xxxx:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('span.gallery-open-item.year-icon-Yes').each(function() {
        var classNames = $(this).attr('class').split(' ');
        for (var i = 0; i < classNames.length; i++) {
            var year = classNames[i].substring(2);
            if (!isNaN(year)) {
                $(this).find('a').attr('href', '/year/' + year);
                break;
            }
        }
    });
});
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This does not actually "replace" the year in the href... –  hurikhan77 Jun 12 '10 at 18:10
    
it's the same end result –  wsanville Jun 12 '10 at 18:16
    
Yes it is, but it's not DRY... You'd have to modify the "/year/" prefix in two places if you change the URL scheming later... If you don't dry this you may wonder about strange bugs coming up suddenly. Don't believe you think of every bit in your code when applying changes weeks later. –  hurikhan77 Jun 12 '10 at 18:39

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