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How do you auto-resize a large image so that it will fit into a smaller width div container whilst maintaining it's width:height ratio?


Example: stackoverflow.com - when an image is inserted onto the editor panel and the image is too large to fit onto the page, the image is automatically resized.

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18 Answers 18

up vote 395 down vote accepted

Do not apply an explicit width or height to the image tag. Instead, give it:

max-width:100%;
max-height:100%;

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/xwrvxser/1/

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16  
height: auto; if you want to specify a width only –  Roi Sep 10 '12 at 23:28
15  
What if the image is too small? –  Scott Rippey Jan 3 '13 at 23:01
4  
@Scott Rippey - If the image is smaller than the container, it won't change because the rules used are max-width and max-height. –  Surreal Dreams Sep 20 '13 at 15:48
2  
@Felipe this worked in Firefox for me. –  Kelvin Dealca Feb 28 at 6:05
2  
With an enclosing <a> tag, the image didn't resize. Applying the rules to the A-tag solved this problem. –  SPRBRN Mar 18 at 13:13

Currently there is no way to do this correctly in a deterministic way, with fixed-size images such as JPEGs or PNG files.

To resize an image proportionally, you have to set either the height or width to "100%", but not both. If you set both to "100%", your image will be stretched.

Choosing whether to do height or width depends on your image and container dimensions:

  1. If your image and container are both "portrait shaped" or both "landscape shaped" (taller than they are wide, or wider than they are tall, respectively), then it doesn't matter which of height or width are "%100".
  2. If your image is portrait, and your container is landscape, you must set height="100%" on the image.
  3. If your image is landscape, and your container is portrait, you must set width="100%" on the image.

If your image is an SVG, which is a variable-sized vector image format, you can have the expansion to fit the container happen automatically.

You just have to ensure that the SVG file has none of these properties set in the <svg> tag:

height
width
viewbox

Most vector drawing programs out there will set these properties when exporting an SVG file, so you will have to manually edit your file every time you export, or write a script to do it.

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1  
Is it just me or are there several mistakes in this post? " 'portrait shaped' or both 'landscape shaped' (wider than they are tall, and taller than they are wide, respectively)" ... shouldn't your "respectives" be switched around? And in your bullet points 2. and 3., they both say "you must set width="100%" on the image". I'm guessing you copy-pasted and forgot to change one of those to "height" rather than "width". –  Buttle Butkus Dec 4 '11 at 11:43
    
Just fixed it. 2 and 3 may now be both wrong or both right, instead of one being wrong and one being right. I can't remember what the correct answer is. ;) –  Neil Dec 5 '11 at 5:33
1  
"Currently there is no way to do this correctly in a deterministic way, with fixed-size images such as JPEGs or PNG files."? This seems just incorrect. @Thorn007's answer provides such a way, and I've used it myself - stackoverflow.com/questions/12259736/… –  Dan Dascalescu Sep 6 '12 at 6:03
    
@DanDascalescu Thorn007's answer doesn't expand the image if it is smaller than the container. The best solution nowadays is to use an element with a background image and set background-size: contain. –  Kevin Borders Oct 9 at 22:42

Here is a solution that will both vertically and horizontally align your img within a div without any stretching even if the image supplied is too small or too big to fit in the div. The html:

<div id="myDiv">
<img alt="Client Logo" title="Client Logo" src="Imagelocation" />
</div>

The CSS:

#myDiv 
{
height:104px;
width:140px;
}
#myDiv img
{
max-width:100%; 
max-height:100%;
margin:auto;
display:block;
}

The JQuery:

var logoHeight = $('#myDiv img').height();
    if (logoHeight < 104) {
        var margintop = (104 - logoHeight) / 2;
        $('#myDiv img').css('margin-top', margintop);
    }

I hope this helps you guys out

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4  
Code works fine for me...!!! Juzt added demo of your code. jsfiddle.net/sahotaparamjitsingh/Kkz4J –  ParaMeterz Oct 29 '13 at 7:03
    
this works for me in Firefox and Chrome and was the easiest solution. I actually have a variable height and width for my div container, so intead of say 140px I set the containing div to height=100%, width=85% for example and this still seems to work. thanks! –  FireDragon Nov 29 '13 at 9:41

make it simple !
Give the Container fixed height and then for the img tag inside it set width and max-height !

<div style="height: 250px">
     <img src="..." alt=" " style="width: 100%;max-height: 100%" />
</div>

difference is that you set the width to be 100% ! not the max-width ! Try it ;)

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This causes image ratio to change in Google Chrome if image is very tall and viewport is short. –  Mikko Rantalainen Jun 11 at 7:25

Check out my solution: http://codepen.io/petethepig/pen/dvFsA

It's written in pure CSS, without any JS code. It can handle images of any size and any orientation.

Given such HTML:

<div class="image">
  <div class="trick"></div>
  <img src="http://placekitten.com/415/200"/>
</div>

CSS code would be:

.image {
  font-size: 0;
  text-align: center;
  width: 200px;  /* Container's dimensions */
  height: 150px;
}
img {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
  max-height: 100%;
  max-width: 100%;
}
.trick {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
  height: 150px;
}
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This does not handle images that are too small. –  Josh C Aug 12 at 23:43
    
@JoshC What do you mean? This one works well: codepen.io/petethepig/pen/maeFo –  dmitry Aug 13 at 11:20
    
404 on the images that are too small. –  Josh C Aug 15 at 3:10

Some interesting libraries for doing image resizing to fit the container:

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I just published a jQuery plugin that do exactly what you need with a lot of options :

https://github.com/GestiXi/image-scale

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1  
This one works beautifully! –  web2kx Oct 19 '13 at 22:20

You can set the image as the background to a div, then use the css background-size property

background-size: cover;

and it will "Scale the background image to be as large as possible so that the background area is completely covered by the background image. Some parts of the background image may not be in view within the background positioning area" -w3schools.com

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The accepted answer from Thorn007 doesn't work when the image is too small.
To solve this, I added a scale factor. This way, it makes the image bigger and it fills the div container.

Example :

<div style="width:400px; height:200px;">
  <img src="pix.jpg" style="max-width:100px; height:50px; transform:scale(4); transform-origin:left top;" />
</div>

notes:
1/ for webkit you must add -webkit-transform:scale(4); -webkit-transform-origin:left top; in the style.
2/ with a scale factor of 4, you have max-width = 400/4 = 100 and max-height = 200/4 = 50
3/ an alternate solution is to set max-width and max-height at 25%, it's even simpler

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This is not a very reliable solution if you're trying to support the whole market. I steer clear of CSS3 unless you're going to have some sort of a fallback for browsers that don't support it. –  dudewad Oct 10 at 19:33

I centered and scaled proportionally an image inside a hyperlink both horizontally and vertically this way:

#link {
    border: 1px solid blue;
    display: table-cell;
    height: 100px;
    vertical-align: middle;
    width: 100px;
}
#link img {
    border: 1px solid red;
    display: block;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
    max-height: 60px;
    max-width: 60px;
}

Tested in IE, Firefox, Safari.

More info about centering is here.

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This solution doesn't stretch the image and fills the whole container, but it cuts some of the image.

html

 <div><img src="/images/image.png"></div>

CSS

div {
  width: 100%;
  height: 10em;
  overflow: hidden;

img {
  min-width: 100%;
  min-height: 100%;

}
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Use CSS! Let it control the height and width of your container (div), and then let it scale your image (img) to match your container. Try this code:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
    <style type="text/css">
        div { 
            height:300px; 
            width:250px}
        img { 
            height:100%;
            width:100%}
    </style>
    <body>
        <div>
            <img src="myPicture.jpg">
        </div>
    </body>
</html>
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4  
This will not proportionally scale your image, it will stretch it. –  Neil Jun 7 '11 at 3:39
1  
Proportional scaling was not a requirement of the OP. In fact, in one of the other comments, he specifically requested a means to adjust height and width. Your downvote was not warrented. –  james.garriss Jun 7 '11 at 15:47
20  
His example implies proportional resizing, and it's reasonable to assume that in most cases people want proportional resizing. This answer is misleading, so it's important that it doesn't rank highly. It's nothing personal. –  Neil Jun 11 '11 at 20:03

Give the height and width you need for your image to the div that contains the < img> tag. don't forget to give the height/width in proper style tag. In the < img> tag, give the max-height and max-width as 100%.

<div style="height:750px; width:700px;">
    <img alt="That Image" style="max-height:100%; max-width:100%;" src="">
</div>

you can add the details in appropriate classes after you got it right.

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The code below is adapted from above and tested by me using an image called storm.jpg This is the complete HTML code for a simple page that displays the image. This works perfect and was tested by me with www.resizemybrowser.com. Put the CSS code at the top of your HTML code, underneath your head section. Put the the picture code wherever you want the picture.

<html>
<style type="text/css">
#myDiv 
{
height:auto;
width:auto;
}
#myDiv img
{
max-width:100%; 
max-height:100%;
margin:auto;
display:block;
}
</style>


<div id="myDiv">
<img src="images/storm.jpg">
</div>
</html>
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The solution is easy with a bit of maths...

Just put the image in a div and then in the html file where you specify the image set the width and height values in percentages using the pixel values of the image to calculate the exact ratio of width to height.

For example, say you have an image that has a width of 200 pixels and a height of 160 pixels. You can safely say that the width value will be 100% because it is the larger value. To then calculate the height value you simply divide the height by the width which gives the percentage value of 80%. In the code it will look something like this...

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<style type="text/css"> 
#container{
text-align:center;
width: 100%;
height: 200px; /*set height*/
margin: 0px;
padding: 0px;
background-image:url("IMAGE URL");
background-size: contain; /*scaling down large image to a div*/
background-repeat:no-repeat;
background-position:center;
}
</style>

<div id="container>
<!--inside container-->
</div>
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If you could add some explanation of your code that would be nice (I know you have some comments there but just a few words about why/how this answers the question would make it look much better). –  Daniel Lisik May 28 at 14:25

A simple solution ( 4-step fix !!) that seem to work for me , is below. Hope it helps.The example uses the width to determine the overall size, but you can also flip it to use the height instead.

  1. Apply CSS styling to the image container ( eg
  2. set the width property to the dimension you want
    • for dimensions use % for relative size,or autoscaling ( based on image container or display ) -use px ( or other ) for a static, or set dimension
  3. set the height property to automatically adjust, based on the width
  4. ENJOY!

for example

<img style="width:100%; height:auto;"
                            src="https://googledrive.com/host/0BwDx0R31u6sYY1hPWnZrencxb1k/thanksgiving.png"
                />
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Define div simply

   div.headerimg1 {
       position: absolute;
       top: 290px;
       left: 81px;
       width: 389px;
            height: 349px;
}
<div class="headerimg1">
<img src="" style="max-height:100%;height:auto;width:100%;max-width:100%;margin:auto;
display:inline;"></div>
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