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I often access shared network folders in Powershell to grab files etc. But if the share requires a username/password, Powershell does not prompt me for these, unlike Windows Explorer. If I connect to the folder first in Windows Explorer, Powershell will then allow me to connect.

How can I authenticate myself in Powershell?

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4 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

At first glance one really wants to use New-PSDrive supplying it credentials.

> New-PSDrive -name myShare -Psprovider FileSystem -root \\server\share -credential domain\user

Fails!

New-PSDrive : Cannot retrieve the dynamic parameters for the cmdlet. Dynamic parameters for NewDrive cannot be retrieved for the 'FileSystem' provider. The provider does not support the use of credentials. Please perform the operation again without specifying credentials.

The documentation states that you can provide a PSCredential object but if you look closer the cmdlet does not support this yet. Maybe in the next version I guess.

Therefore you can either use net use or the WScript.Network object, calling the MapNetworkDrive function:

$net = new-object -ComObject WScript.Network
$net.MapNetworkDrive("u:", "\\server\share", $false, "domain\user", "password")
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There's an open bug for this: connect.microsoft.com/feedback/… –  halr9000 Nov 20 '08 at 21:21
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Actually, I think the cmdlet supports it just fine - it's the underlying PSDrive provider that isn't doing anything with it. All the *-Item cmdlets have a generic set of behaviors; they just pass them through to the PSDrive provider, though. -filter is another example. –  Don Jones Nov 29 '08 at 17:22
    
Looking at the docs, you'll notice that it says the parameter is not implemented for the cmdlet. technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb978543.aspx –  Scott Saad Nov 30 '08 at 16:01
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This is not a PowerShell-specific answer, but you could authenticate against the share using "NET USE" first:

net use \\server\share /user:<domain\username> <password>

And then do whatever you need to do in PowerShell...

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This is one of those "use what works" cases where I agree with Anon. Normally, I would go out of my way to provide a PowerShell answer but not this time. :) –  halr9000 Nov 20 '08 at 15:28
    
This is good way to access windows share from other languages. –  Trismegistos Jan 16 at 16:17
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PowerShell 3 supports this out of the box now.

If you're stuck on PowerShell 2, you basically have to either use the legacy net use command (as suggested earlier), or the network Impersonation module that I wrote a while back (specifically to address this).

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On the same machine, I try the same NET USE command from a regular command prompt, and from a PowerShell v2 command prompt:

NET USE Link : SharePoint

In CMD it works just fine.

In PS, it says it works fine, and the drive is mapped. However, mostly the drive's status as listed when you type just NET USE is blank, and the drive mapping doesn't work (i.e. you cannot get data from the mapped drive).

It might be a SharePoint issue as the NET USE from powershell sometimes works, sometimes don't, but still it appears that there's a difference between CMD and PS.

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