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In my query I need to return instances of a class that doesn't have a default constructor (specifically this is in a custom Membership provider, and MembershipUser is the culprit)

var users = from l in context.Logins
    select new MembershipUser(
        Name,
        l.Username, // username
        l.Id, // provider key
        l.MailTo,
        l.PasswordQuestion,
        l.Notes.FirstOrDefault().NoteText,
        l.IsApproved,
        l.IsLockedOut,
        l.CreatedOn,
        l.LastLoginOn.HasValue ? l.LastLoginOn.Value : DateTime.MinValue,
        l.LastActivityOn.HasValue ? l.LastActivityOn.Value : DateTime.MinValue,
        DateTime.MinValue,
        l.LastLockedOutOn.HasValue ? l.LastLockedOutOn.Value : DateTime.MinValue
    );

is syntacitally correct, but results in a runtime error as Only parameterless constructors and initializers are supported in LINQ to Entities.

Update: as a workaround I'm now bringing the selection into a List (which resolves the runs the query expression) then I can select the new MembershipUser from that list.

var users = (from l in context.Logins
    select new { login = l }).ToList().Select(u => new MembershipUser (
Name,
u.login.Username, // username
u.login.Id, // provider key
u.email.MailTo,
u.login.PasswordQuestion,
u.login.Notes.FirstOrDefault().NoteText,
u.login.IsApproved,
u.login.IsLockedOut,
u.login.CreatedOn,
u.login.LastLoginOn.HasValue ? u.login.LastLoginOn.Value : DateTime.MinValue,
u.login.LastActivityOn.HasValue ? u.login.LastActivityOn.Value : DateTime.MinValue,
DateTime.MinValue,
u.login.LastLockedOutOn.HasValue ? u.login.LastLockedOutOn.Value : DateTime.MinValue
    );
share|improve this question
1  
You don't need to waste the time and memory on materializing to a List via ToList(). Just resolve to a disconnected IEnumerable<T> using AsEnumerable() like Gabe answered. – Aaronaught Jun 13 '10 at 13:37
up vote 12 down vote accepted

I think the problem is that you need to escape from LINQ to Entities and get to LINQ to Objects, which allows arbitrary method calls. The AsEnumerable extension method does this for you. How about this:

var users = from l in context.Logins.AsEnumerable() 
    select new MembershipUser( 
        Name, 
        l.Username, // username 
        l.Id, // provider key 
        l.MailTo, 
        l.PasswordQuestion, 
        l.Notes.FirstOrDefault().NoteText, 
        l.IsApproved, 
        l.IsLockedOut, 
        l.CreatedOn, 
        l.LastLoginOn ?? DateTime.MinValue, 
        l.LastActivityOn ?? DateTime.MinValue, 
        DateTime.MinValue, 
        l.LastLockedOutOn ?? DateTime.MinValue 
    ); 
share|improve this answer
    
No because "LINQ to Entities does not recognize the method and this method cannot be translated into a store expression" – Ralph Shillington Jun 13 '10 at 12:15
    
I updated my answer to be more useful, I hope. – Gabe Jun 13 '10 at 13:34
    
Makes total sense now. Thanks. – Ralph Shillington Jun 13 '10 at 22:36
    
Won't this mean that any where parts won't get converted to a SQL WHERE clause? Won't it just pull all Logins down and then LINQ->Objects takes over for the where filtering? – Sean Hanley Jan 30 '12 at 18:06
1  
@SeanHanley: You put all of your filtering/grouping/joining/sorting logic before the AsEnumerable. The last two steps in you query are .AsEnumerable().Select(r => new ...). – Gabe Jan 30 '12 at 20:27

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