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how i can set default value for DateTime in optional parameter?

public SomeClassInit(Guid docId, DateTime addedOn = DateTime.Now???)
{
    //Init codes here
}
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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Camilo Martin, Richard Everett, Hristo Iliev, Tom Redfern May 16 '13 at 15:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6 Answers 6

up vote 32 down vote accepted

There is a workaround for this, taking advantage of nullable types and the fact that null is a compile-time constant. (It's a bit of a hack though, and I'd suggest avoiding it unless you really can't.)

public void SomeClassInit(Guid docId, DateTime? addedOn = null)
{
    if (!addedOn.HasValue)
        addedOn = DateTime.Now;

    //Init codes here
}

In general, I'd prefer the standard overloading approach suggested in the other answers:

public SomeClassInit(Guid docId)
{
    SomeClassInit(docId, DateTime.Now);
}

public SomeClassInit(Guid docId, DateTime addedOn)
{
    //Init codes here
}
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I don't really understand why optional params must be compile-time constants. The compiler could easily create the 2 methods you wrote from the one with the optional param...I usually prefer having one method with several optional params instead of several methods, it makes the code smaller and thus easier to read. –  user276648 May 22 '12 at 8:48
1  
You can use coalesce here: addedOn = addedOn ?? DateTime.Now –  Zaid Masud Sep 19 '12 at 20:36
    
Nullables can cause casting problems deep in your code, so I am not a fan. I am becoming increasing disappointed in C#. I mean, even VB.net has literal dates, such as: Optional addedOn As DateTime = #12:00:00 PM# –  Brain2000 Mar 3 at 17:40

.NET 4.0 does have optional parameters. (google is also your friend, here.)

EDIT (because of Anthony Pegram correct, comment)...

And yes, that is how you would do it.

But DateTime.Now (static property, on that class) is not know until run-time. As such, you can't use that as an optional value.

.NET 3.5 doesn't ... so then you would have to do what JS Bangs said...

public SomeClassInit(Guid docId) 
{ 
    return SomeClassInit(docId, DateTime.Now);
}

public SomeClassInit(Guid docId, DateTime addedOn = DateTime.Now???) 
{ 
    //Init codes here 
}

or even the null checking/null value parameter from munificent's answer.

Cheers Anthony.

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The default value must be a compile time constant, so this is not going to work even in 4.0. –  Anthony Pegram Jun 13 '10 at 4:58
    
Confirmed Anothony. I'll re-edit my post. Cheers. –  Pure.Krome Jun 13 '10 at 5:03

I'd slightly modify LukeH's solution as:

public void SomeClassInit(Guid docId, DateTime? addedOn = null)
{
    DateTime TargetDateTimeProperty = addedOn ?? DateTime.Now;
}

which is shorter and more readable, it seems.

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I guess that you did not really want addedOn = DateTime.Now because that would suggest you never get any result as everything would be added before 'Now'. :)

A default DateTime can be set like this:

public void SomeClassInit(Guid docId, DateTime addedOn = default(DateTime))

Update
If you deal with SQL Server, do not forget that it doesn't accept default(DateTime) what is 1/1/0001. SQL Server's minimal DateTime is 1/1/1753 (explanation). SQL's DateTime2 accepts 1/1/0001, though.

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Don't use an optional parameter:

public SomeClassInit(Guid docId, DateTime addedOn)
{
    SomeClassInitCore(docId, addedOn);
}

public SomeClassInit(Guid docId)
{
    SomeClassInitCore(docId, null);
}

private SomeClassInitCore(Guid docId, DateTime? addedOn)
{
    // set default value
    if (addedOn.IsNull) addedOn = DateTime.Now;

    //Init codes here
}
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C# doesn't have optional parameters in this sense. If you want to make addedOn optional, you should write an overload that doesn't require that parameter, and passes DateTime.Now to the two-argument version.

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er.. sure abot that JS Bangs? for framework version .NET 3.5 and below, you are correct. otherwise, 4.0 and above, it is supported. –  Pure.Krome Jun 13 '10 at 4:54
1  
@Pure.Krome, default values for optional parameters must be compile time constants. So this is not supported. (This answer could be worded better, however.) –  Anthony Pegram Jun 13 '10 at 4:57
    
i too misunderstood the wording. soz JS. –  Pure.Krome Jun 13 '10 at 5:09

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