Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

R has a qr() function, which performs QR decomposition using either LINPACK or LAPACK (in my experience, the latter is 5% faster). The main object returned is a matrix "qr" that contains in the upper triangular matrix R (i.e. R=qr[upper.tri(qr)]). So far so good. The lower triangular part of qr contains Q "in compact form". One can extract Q from the qr decomposition by using qr.Q(). I would like to find the inverse of qr.Q(). In other word, I do have Q and R, and would like to put them in a "qr" object. R is trivial but Q is not. The goal is to apply to it qr.solve(), which is much faster than solve() on large systems.

share|improve this question
    
Matrix qr contains factor R in the upper triangular matrix, including the diagonal. R = qr[upper.tri(qr)] returns only the elements above the diagonal, and also they are not returned as a matrix. To get a matrix containing only the upper triangle with the diagonal, one option is R = qr*upper.tri(qr, diag=TRUE). –  David Alber Sep 21 '11 at 20:23

3 Answers 3

Introduction

R uses the LINPACK dqrdc routine, by default, or the LAPACK DGEQP3 routine, when specified, for computing the QR decomposition. Both routines compute the decomposition using Householder reflections. An m x n matrix A is decomposed into an m x n economy-size orthogonal matrix (Q) and an n x n upper triangular matrix (R) as A = QR, where Q can be computed by the product of t Householder reflection matrices, with t being the lesser of m-1 and n: Q = H1H2...Ht.

Each reflection matrix Hi can be represented by a length-(m-i+1) vector. For example, H1 requires a length-m vector for compact storage. All but one entry of this vector is placed in the first column of the lower triangle of the input matrix (the diagonal is used by the R factor). Therefore, each reflection needs one more scalar of storage, and this is provided by an auxiliary vector (called $qraux in the result from R's qr).

The compact representation used is different between the LINPACK and LAPACK routines.

The LINPACK Way

A Householder reflection is computed as Hi = I - viviT/pi, where I is the identity matrix, pi is the corresponding entry in $qraux, and vi is as follows:

  • vi[1..i-1] = 0,
  • vi[i] = pi
  • vi[i+1:m] = A[i+1..m, i] (i.e., a column of the lower triangle of A after calling qr)

LINPACK Example

Let's work through the example from the QR decomposition article at Wikipedia in R.

The matrix being decomposed is

> A <- matrix(c(12, 6, -4, -51, 167, 24, 4, -68, -41), nrow=3)
> A
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]   12  -51    4
[2,]    6  167  -68
[3,]   -4   24  -41

We do the decomposition, and the most relevant portions of the result is shown below:

> Aqr = qr(A)
> Aqr
$qr
            [,1]         [,2] [,3]
[1,] -14.0000000  -21.0000000   14
[2,]   0.4285714 -175.0000000   70
[3,]  -0.2857143    0.1107692  -35

[snip...]

$qraux
[1]  1.857143  1.993846 35.000000

[snip...]

This decomposition was done (under the covers) by computing two Householder reflections and multiplying them by A to get R. We will now recreate the reflections from the information in $qr.

> p = Aqr$qraux   # for convenience
> v1 <- matrix(c(p[1], Aqr$qr[2:3,1]))
> v1
           [,1]
[1,]  1.8571429
[2,]  0.4285714
[3,] -0.2857143

> v2 <- matrix(c(0, p[2], Aqr$qr[3,2]))
> v2
          [,1]
[1,] 0.0000000
[2,] 1.9938462
[3,] 0.1107692

> I = diag(3)   # identity matrix
> H1 = I - v1 %*% t(v1)/p[1]   # I - v1*v1^T/p[1]
> H2 = I - v2 %*% t(v2)/p[2]   # I - v2*v2^T/p[2]

> Q = H1 %*% H2
> Q
           [,1]       [,2]        [,3]
[1,] -0.8571429  0.3942857  0.33142857
[2,] -0.4285714 -0.9028571 -0.03428571
[3,]  0.2857143 -0.1714286  0.94285714

Now let's verify the Q computed above is correct:

> qr.Q(Aqr)
           [,1]       [,2]        [,3]
[1,] -0.8571429  0.3942857  0.33142857
[2,] -0.4285714 -0.9028571 -0.03428571
[3,]  0.2857143 -0.1714286  0.94285714

Looks good! We can also verify QR is equal to A.

> R = qr.R(Aqr)   # extract R from Aqr$qr
> Q %*% R
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]   12  -51    4
[2,]    6  167  -68
[3,]   -4   24  -41

The LAPACK Way

A Householder reflection is computed as Hi = I - piviviT, where I is the identity matrix, pi is the corresponding entry in $qraux, and vi is as follows:

  • vi[1..i-1] = 0,
  • vi[i] = 1
  • vi[i+1:m] = A[i+1..m, i] (i.e., a column of the lower triangle of A after calling qr)

There is another twist when using the LAPACK routine in R: column pivoting is used, so the decomposition is solving a different, related problem: AP = QR, where P is a permutation matrix.

LAPACK Example

This section does the same example as before.

> A <- matrix(c(12, 6, -4, -51, 167, 24, 4, -68, -41), nrow=3)
> Bqr = qr(A, LAPACK=TRUE)
> Bqr
$qr
            [,1]        [,2]       [,3]
[1,] 176.2554964 -71.1694118   1.668033
[2,]  -0.7348557  35.4388886  -2.180855
[3,]  -0.1056080   0.6859203 -13.728129

[snip...]

$qraux
[1] 1.289353 1.360094 0.000000

$pivot
[1] 2 3 1

attr(,"useLAPACK")
[1] TRUE

[snip...]

Notice the $pivot field; we will come back to that. Now we generate Q from the information the Aqr.

> p = Bqr$qraux   # for convenience
> v1 = matrix(c(1, Bqr$qr[2:3,1]))
> v1
           [,1]
[1,]  1.0000000
[2,] -0.7348557
[3,] -0.1056080


> v2 = matrix(c(0, 1, Bqr$qr[3,2]))
> v2
          [,1]
[1,] 0.0000000
[2,] 1.0000000
[3,] 0.6859203


> H1 = I - p[1]*v1 %*% t(v1)   # I - p[1]*v1*v1^T
> H2 = I - p[2]*v2 %*% t(v2)   # I - p[2]*v2*v2^T
> Q = H1 %*% H2
           [,1]        [,2]       [,3]
[1,] -0.2893527 -0.46821615 -0.8348944
[2,]  0.9474882 -0.01602261 -0.3193891
[3,]  0.1361660 -0.88346868  0.4482655

Once again, the Q computed above agrees with the R-provided Q.

> qr.Q(Bqr)
           [,1]        [,2]       [,3]
[1,] -0.2893527 -0.46821615 -0.8348944
[2,]  0.9474882 -0.01602261 -0.3193891
[3,]  0.1361660 -0.88346868  0.4482655

Finally, let's compute QR.

> R = qr.R(Bqr)
> Q %*% R
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]  -51    4   12
[2,]  167  -68    6
[3,]   24  -41   -4

Notice the difference? QR is A with its columns permuted given the order in Bqr$pivot above.

share|improve this answer

I am confused regarding the qr.Q() code. I tried it and it doesn't seem to work. I'm sure I made a mistake. Could you elaborate on this point of code?

I will say one thing that solve() also depends / uses LAPACK along with almost all the general linear algebra stuff in R. So it should be very fast for large systems as well. You can try to compile R from source with the latest ATLAS libraries. If you have a multicore computer you can use multithreaded ATLAS BLAS & LAPACK, which is extremely fast, comparable to the commercial MKL BLAS & LAPACK from Intel. ATLAS is open source. Using multithreaded ATLAS on a centrino duo Ubuntu 64-bit laptop, I could matrix multiply a 3000 by 3000 matrix of doubles with itself in around 4 seconds. I think all serious R users should take advantage of multithreaded ATLAS. Imho solve() should not be that slow especially if you are taking advantage of all available threads.

Please do elaborate on qr.Q(). Thanks.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think you can do this. I took a look at the qr.solve code and as I see it I think it will take a QR decomp of Q and then return the inverse. I don't think that's what we want and there really doesn't seem to be another way around this. qr.solve will take a matrix, check whether it is a qr object, if not it will take a qr decomp of the matrix and then proceed forward. Turning Q into a qr object and then using the qr.solve method can not be done. At least in my opinion. I could very well be wrong. However as I said before solve() is fast if you use multithreaded ATLAS. –  Hamaad Shah Jun 13 '10 at 15:56

I have researched for this same problem as the OP asks and I don't think it is possible. Basically the OP question is whether having the explicitly computed Q, one can recover the H1 H2 ... Ht. I do not think this is possible without computing the QR from scratch but I would also be very interested to know whether there is such solution.

I have a similar issue as the OP but in a different context, my iterative algorithm needs to mutate the matrix A by adding columns and/or rows. The first time, the QR is computed using DGEQRF and thus, the compact LAPACK format. After the matrix A is mutated e.g. with new rows I can quickly build a new set of reflectors or rotators that will annihilate the non-zero elements of the lowest diagonal of my existing R and build a new R but now I have a set of H1_old H2_old ... Hn_old and H1_new H2_new ... Hn_new (and similarly tau's) which can't be mixed up into a single QR compact representation. The two possibilities I have are, and maybe the OP has the same two possibilities:

  1. Always maintain Q and R explicitly separated whether when computed the first time or after every update at the cost of extra flops but keeping the required memory well bounded.
  2. Stick to the compact LAPACK format but then every time a new update comes in, keep a list of all these mini sets of update reflectors. At the point of solving the system one would do a big Q'*c i.e. H1_u3*H2_u3*...*Hn_u3*H1_u2*H2_u2*...*Hn_u2*H1_u1*H2_u1...*Hn_u1*H1*H2*...*Hn*c where ui is the QR update number and this is potentially a lot of multiplications to do and memory to keep track of but definitely the fastest way.

The long answer from David basically explains what the compact QR format is but not how to get to this compact QR format having the explicit computed Q and R as input.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.