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#include<stdio.h>

class A {public: int a; };
class B: public A {private: int a;};

int main(){
    B b;
    printf("%d", b.a);
    return 0;
}

#include<stdio.h>

class A {public: int a; };
class B: private A {};

int main(){
    B b;
    printf("%d", b.a);
    return 0;
}

I ask because I get different errors:

error: 'int B::a' is private

error: 'int A::a' is inaccessible

Apart from what the errors might reveal, is there any difference at all in the behaviour of these two pieces of code?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

They are different. In the first instance, you are creating two instances of the variable 'a'. One in the base class, one in the child class. In both examples you can't get access to the variable.

If you have:

A *pA = new B();
pA->a; // This will refer to A::a, which is allowed as it was defined public.

B *pB = new B();
pB->a; // This will refer to B::a, which you can't get access to.

If you want to hide access to the 'a' variable, I suggest the second example, using private inheritance. Be aware that private inheritance will also make any functions defined in the base class private.

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In second example also, because of private inheritance, a will be there, but not accessible. so, whats the difference? –  Moeb Jun 13 '10 at 18:36
    
@Poiuyt : There are several differences, one obviously being the declaration, and some of which Mark pointed out. Maybe you need to clarify what you mean by "what's the difference?". –  Stephen Jun 13 '10 at 19:10
    
@Poiuyt: In the first example, it's not the same a. It's a different a that's masking A::a. –  Andrew Coleson Jun 13 '10 at 19:44

In your first example, class B has two members named a, the one that it inherits from class A and the one that it defines itself. An object of class B ends up being larger as a result, and you can still access class A's a member explicitly:

#include <stdio.h>

class A {public: int a; };
class B: public A {private: int a;};

int main()
{
    A a;
    B b;
    printf("sizeof(a) == %d, sizeof(b) == %d\n", sizeof(a), sizeof(b));

    b.A::a = 42;
    printf("%d\n", b.A::a);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
ohh. shouldn't there be name conflicts? two variables with the same name? –  Moeb Jun 13 '10 at 19:18
    
@Poiuyt: It's legal for both variables to be named a because they have different scopes. It's similar to having a global variable a, then defining a local variable a within a function. The local variable will hide the global one, though you could still access the global variable by using ::a. –  Josh Townzen Jun 14 '10 at 1:08

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