Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Can you explain why this is not allowed,

#include <stdio.h>

class B {
private:
    int a;
public:
    int a;
};

int main() {
    return 0;
}

while this is?

#include <stdio.h>

class A {
public:
    int a;
};

class B : public A{
private:
    int a;
};

int main() {
    return 0;
}

In both the cases, we have one public and one private variable named a in class B.


edited now!

share|improve this question
    
@Neil: You mean the 2nd one declares a Class A? – Alan Jun 13 '10 at 19:37
1  
@Alan Yes - I was so bemused by the question I got a bit confused :-) – anon Jun 13 '10 at 19:38
3  
Why does this have a downvote? It's a reasonable question, I remember wondering the same thing while learning classes in C++... – Cam Jun 13 '10 at 19:39
    
This seems more like a question than a doubt. Do you lack confidence in C++'s inheritance? – Thanatos Jun 13 '10 at 19:42
    
@incrediman The downvotes were for the question before the OP edited it, completely changing its sense. – anon Jun 13 '10 at 19:43
up vote 15 down vote accepted

In both the cases, we have one public and one private variable named a in class B.

No, thats not true.

In the first case, you can't have two identifiers with the same name in the same scope. While in the second case, B::a hides A::a, and to access A::a you have to fully qualify the name:

b.a = 10; // Error. You can't access a private member.
b.A::a = 10; // OK.
share|improve this answer

Because B::a hides A::a in the second example. You can still access it, but it needs explicit qualification for the compiler to figure out you are asking for the member of parent class with the same hame.

In the first example both a's are in the same scope, while in the second example the scopes are different.

share|improve this answer

Class B in the first example is not valid because C++ cannot distinguish members by their access specifiers (public/private/protected). However, namespaces are a way for C++ to distinguish members. In class B in the second code you don't have a "public a" and a "private a", you have B::a and A::a.

Even if declaring members of the same name/signature with different access specifiers was allowed, there would be no way to address the correct member.

share|improve this answer

The first isn't allowed because it leads to ambiguous definitions. In the 2nd, although you do have both a public and a private a integer variable, you've hidden A::a inside your B class. The compiler knows implicitly what you want because there is a way to explicitly access a hidden variables.

I also believe that it boils down to name mangaling: storage specifiers don't end up as part of the actual name. I could be wrong on this however.

The easiest way to illustrate why one is allowed and why the other isn't is to look at how the compiler would compile a member function that uses each variable.

Inside your class b:

class b {

int a;
public:
int a;

void myMethod()
{
 a = 10; //what a should the compiler use? Ambiguous, so the compiler sez BZZT.
}

}

For the 2nd example:

class A
{
public: 
int a;
}

class B: public A
{
private:
int a;

void someMethod()
{
 a = 10; //implied that you are using B::a (which may be a programmer error)

}

}
share|improve this answer
    
sorry for that. edited now! – Moeb Jun 13 '10 at 19:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.