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what is the difference between const int*, const int * const, int const *

What is the difference between

A const * pa2 = pa1;

and

A * const pa2 = pa1;

(I have some class A for example).

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marked as duplicate by James McNellis, Johannes Schaub - litb, Jonathan Leffler, Paul R, greyfade Jun 13 '10 at 21:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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Duplicate of what is the difference between const int*, const int * const, int const * (I knew this had been asked before, it just took me a while to find it :-P) –  James McNellis Jun 13 '10 at 20:44
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Read the type from right to left:

A const * pa2 = pa1;

pa2 is a pointer to a read-only A (the object may not be changed through the pointer)

A * const pa2 = pa1;

pa2 is a read-only pointer to A (the pointer may not be changed)

This does not mean that A cannot change (or is actually constant) const is misleading, understand it always as read-only. Other aliased pointers might modify A.

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A const * pa2

This is a non-const pointer to a const A. You can change where the pointer points but you can't change the object pointed to by the pointer.

A * const pa2

This is a const pointer to a non-const A. You can't change where the pointer points but you can change the object pointed to by the pointer.

A const * const pa2

This is a const pointer to a const A. You can't change where the pointer points and you can't change the object pointed to by the pointer.

You may find the "Clockwise/Spiral Rule" helpful when trying to decipher declarations in C and C++.

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+1: Very useful link - thanks. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 13 '10 at 20:45
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It means that the first is a pointer to a const object, which (loosely) means the object can't be change.

The second is a const pointer to an object, which means the pointer itself can not be changed (ie assigned to a different object).

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