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For example

int[] Array = { 1, 23, 4, 5, 3, 3, 232, 32, };

Array.JustDo(x => Console.WriteLine(x));
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I know that I can write my own extension method but i wonder is there already exist one. –  Freshblood Jun 13 '10 at 21:15
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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I think you're looking for Array.ForEach which doesn't require you to convert to a List<> first.

int[] a = { 1, 23, 4, 5, 3, 3, 232, 32, };
Array.ForEach(a, x => Console.WriteLine(x));
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int[] array hasn't that extension method. –  Freshblood Jun 13 '10 at 21:21
    
@Freshblood - but the array class does. You just have to do it like the sample shows. –  Joel Coehoorn Jun 13 '10 at 21:23
    
@Freshblood: If you look at my code example Array is not the name of the int array it's the name of the Array class. And yes it works with int arrays as my code demonstrates. You can compile it and try it. –  Brian R. Bondy Jun 13 '10 at 21:23
    
@Brian sorry.At a glance i haven't seen that you defined int[] a but i had defined int[] array :) thats why i haven't consider your extension method –  Freshblood Jun 13 '10 at 21:27
    
@Freshblood: np, I had to change the name of the variable for that reason :) –  Brian R. Bondy Jun 13 '10 at 21:30
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You can use the Array.ForEach method

int[] array = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
Array.ForEach(array, x => Console.WriteLine(x));

or make your own extension method

void Main()
{
    int[] array = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    array.JustDo(x => Console.WriteLine(x));
}

public static class MyExtension
{
    public static void JustDo<T>(this IEnumerable<T> ext, Action<T> a)
    {
        foreach(T item in ext)
        {
            a(item);
        }
    }
}
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int[] array hasn't that extension method but It is nice to know collection has this extension. –  Freshblood Jun 13 '10 at 21:17
    
Writing extension method is also not bad. –  Freshblood Jun 13 '10 at 21:35
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As others have said, you can use Array.ForEach. However, you might like to read Eric Lippert's thoughts on this.

If you still want it after reading that, there is the Do method in the System.Interactive assembly which is part of Reactive Extensions, as part of EnumerableEx. You'd use it like this:

int[] array = { 1, 23, 4, 5, 3, 3, 232, 32, };   
array.Do(x => Console.WriteLine(x));

(I've changed the name of the variable to avoid confusion. It's generally better not to name variables with the same name as a type.)

There's plenty of great stuff to look at in Reactive Extensions...

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I can't find System.Interactive namespace .... –  Freshblood Jun 13 '10 at 21:43
    
@Freshblood: No, it's in the System.Interactive assembly which is part of Reactive Extensions. I think it's still in the System.Linq namespace. I'll edit my post to make this clearer. –  Jon Skeet Jun 13 '10 at 22:04
    
I think IX died in RC. nuget.org/packages/Ix_Experimental-Main –  yzorg Jan 11 '13 at 19:19
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