Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For example, does an operator exist to handle this?

float Result, Number1, Number2;

Number1 = 2;
Number2 = 2;

Result = Number1 (operator) Number2;

In the past the ^ operator has served as an exponential operator in other languages, but in C# it is a bit-wise operator.

Do I have to write a loop or include another namespace to handle exponential operations? If so, how do I handle exponential operations using non-integers?

share|improve this question
4  
It's not in C#, but many languages use ** as the infix exponentiation operator. –  Mark Rushakoff Jun 14 '10 at 1:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 77 down vote accepted

The C# language doesn't have a power operator. However, the .NET Framework offers the Math.Pow method:

Returns a specified number raised to the specified power.

So your example would look like this:

float Result, Number1, Number2;

Number1 = 2;
Number2 = 2;

Result = Math.Pow(Number1, Number2);
share|improve this answer
    
Great. Thanks for the clear answer. I appreciate it. –  Charlie Jun 14 '10 at 1:44

There is a blog post on MSDN about why an exponent operator does NOT exists from the C# team.

It would be possible to add a power operator to the language, but performing this operation is a fairly rare thing to do in most programs, and it doesn't seem justified to add an operator when calling Math.Pow() is simple.


You asked:

Do I have to write a loop or include another namespace to handle exponential operations? If so, how do I handle exponential operations using non-integers?

Math.Pow supports double parameters so there is no need for you to write your own.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent. Thanks! –  Charlie Jun 14 '10 at 1:45
2  
I understand the argument, but a valid reason would be that Math.Pow() cannot be used to set const values, which makes exponents unusable for all constants. –  jsmars Mar 19 at 8:44

I stumbled on this post looking to use scientific notation in my code, I used

4.95*Math.Pow(10,-10);

But afterwards I found out you can do

4.95E-10;

Just thought I would add this for anyone in a similar situation that I was in.

share|improve this answer

I'm surprised no one has mentioned this, but for the simple (and probably most encountered) case of squaring, you just multiply by itself.

float Result, Number1;

Result = Number1 * Number1;
share|improve this answer

For Reverse Engineer

public static string ArbitarySystemToString(string arbitaryString, int radix)
{
    if (radix < 2 || radix > Digits.Length)
        throw new ArgumentException("The radix must be >= 2 and <= " + Digits.Length.ToString());

    long Output = 0;
    int Counter = 0;
    while (arbitaryString.Length != 0)
    {
        char CurrentCharacter = arbitaryString[arbitaryString.Length - 1];
        Output = Output + (Digits.IndexOf(CurrentCharacter) * (long)(Math.Pow(radix, Counter)));
        arbitaryString = arbitaryString.Substring(0, arbitaryString.Length - 1);
        Counter = Counter + 1;
    }
    return Output.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
this is not a direct answer to the question and not really useful –  Mobiletainment Nov 20 '13 at 11:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.