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I have defined a class named MyClass and I have defined two methods myMethod1 and myMethod2 for it:

function MyClass() {}
MyClass.prototype.myMethod1 = function() {...};
MyClass.prototype.myMethod2 = function() {...};

Inside myMethod1, I use jQuery and there's a callback closure defined there:

MyClass.prototype.myMethod2 = function() {
 $.jQuery({success: function(data) {
  this.myMethod2();
 }, ...});
}

Now the problem is that this no longer is referring to MyClass. The question is how can I refer to it? At the moment I have assigned it to a variable named thisObj and access it this way:

MyClass.prototype.myMethod2 = function() {
 var thisObj = this;
 $.jQuery({success: function(data) {
  thisObj.myMethod2();
 }, ...});
}

Is there a better way to access MyClass.this from the closure nested in myMethod2?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The method you've used is often called the "that reference", because the name that is commonly used as a name for the copy of the this reference. See Crockford's talks on JavaScript for example.

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Or self. I can't stand that, it's completely misleading. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Jun 14 '10 at 8:36
    
@T.J & @Daniel: Or maybe parent as in the closure's parent context? However as that's the convention to use that or self, then that's fine... :-) –  Behrang Jun 14 '10 at 8:58
    
Guys both of your answers deserve a check mark, however as I can't do that, I check mark the first answer, and up vote both of them. –  Behrang Jun 14 '10 at 9:00
    
@bytecode: Right thing to do going with the first right answer. :-) Re naming, both self and that are widely used. self has a long pedigree, it's the this of Smalltalk, and Smalltalk is an ancestor of JavaScript's, indirectly through the language Self. I've also seen me, presumably as an homage to Visual Basic. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 14 '10 at 9:33
    
@T.J: The thing is, when using self, that, or me inside the closure, it is not really referencing to this (i.e. the closure) anymore and it is actually referring to its parent context. On the other hand, if you define the reference as parent, in the place where you define it, it is not really the parent but this itself and we have some kind of paradox here! :) Having said that as I've seen self being used in a couple of other languages, and as you said in Smalltalk too, I am also mentally more comfortable with self. –  Behrang Jun 14 '10 at 10:55
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Your solution is perfectly fine. Since you already have a closure there, may as well make use of it, that's absolutely fine.

But if you like, you can use jQuery.proxy instead, like this:

MyClass.prototype.myMethod2 = function() {

    $.jQuery({success: jQuery.proxy(function(data) {
        this.myMethod2();
    }, this), ...});
}

Again, though, there's nothing wrong with your original solution. Using proxy can be helpful, though, when you want to reuse a function in lots of different places, or when you don't already have a closure and don't want to introduce one (perhaps because it would close over a lot of unrelated stuff). The good thing about proxy is that it creates a closure over a controlled set of stuff and not over the current scope.

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You can pass a reference to this to the function, but your solution seems fine to me. You are just using the lexical scoping rules of Javascript so what is wrong?

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