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I'm seeing odd behaviour using the StreamWriter class writing extra data to a file using this code:

public void WriteToCSV(string filename)
{
    StreamWriter streamWriter = null;
    try
    {
        streamWriter = new StreamWriter(filename);
        Log.Info("Writing CSV report header information ... ");
        streamWriter.WriteLine("\"{0}\",\"{1}\",\"{2}\",\"{3}\"", ((int)CSVRecordType.Header).ToString("D2", CultureInfo.CurrentCulture), m_InputFilename, m_LoadStartDate, m_LoadEndDate);

        int recordCount = 0;

        if (SummarySection)
        {
            Log.Info("Writing CSV report summary section ... ");
            foreach (KeyValuePair<KeyValuePair<LoadStatus, string>, CategoryResult> categoryResult in m_DataLoadResult.DataLoadResults)
             {
                streamWriter.WriteLine("\"{0}\",\"{1}\",\"{2}\",\"{3}\"", ((int)CSVRecordType.Summary).ToString("D2", CultureInfo.CurrentCulture), categoryResult.Value.StatusString, categoryResult.Value.Count.ToString(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture), categoryResult.Value.Category);
                recordCount++;
             }
        }

        Log.Info("Writing CSV report cases section ... ");
        foreach (KeyValuePair<KeyValuePair<LoadStatus, string>, CategoryResult> categoryResult in m_DataLoadResult.DataLoadResults)
        {
            foreach (CaseLoadResult result in categoryResult.Value.CaseLoadResults)
            {
                if ((LoadStatus.Success == result.Status && SuccessCases) ||
                    (LoadStatus.Warnings == result.Status && WarningCases) ||
                    (LoadStatus.Failure == result.Status && FailureCases) ||
                    (LoadStatus.NotProcessed == result.Status && NotProcessedCases))
                {
                    streamWriter.Write("\"{0}\",\"{1}\",\"{2}\",\"{3}\",\"{4}\"", ((int)CSVRecordType.Result).ToString("D2", CultureInfo.CurrentCulture), result.Status, result.UniqueId, result.Category, result.ClassicReference);
                    if (RawResponse)
                    {
                        streamWriter.Write(",\"{0}\"", result.ResponseXml);
                    }
                    streamWriter.WriteLine();
                    recordCount++;
                }
            }
        }

        streamWriter.WriteLine("\"{0}\",\"{1}\"", ((int)CSVRecordType.Count).ToString("D2", CultureInfo.CurrentCulture), recordCount);

        Log.Info("CSV report written to '{0}'", fileName);
    }
    catch (IOException execption)
    {
        string errorMessage = string.Format(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, "Unable to write XML report to '{0}'", fileName);
        Log.Error(errorMessage);
        Log.Error(exception.Message);
        throw new MyException(errorMessage, exception);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (null != streamWriter)
        {
            streamWriter.Close();
        }
    }
}

The file produced contains a set of records on each line 0 to N, for example:

[Record Zero]
[Record One]
...
[Record N]

However the file produced either contains nulls or incomplete records from further up the file appended to the end. For example:

[Record Zero]
[Record One]
...
[Record N]
[Lots of nulls]

or

[Record Zero]
[Record One]
...
[Record N]
[Half complete records]

This also happens in separate pieces of code that also use the StreamWriter class. Furthermore, the files produced all have sizes that are multiples of 1024. I've been unable to reproduce this behaviour on any other machine and have tried recreating the environment. Previous versions of the application didn't exhibite this behaviour despite having the same code for the methods in question.

EDIT: Added extra code.

share|improve this question
3  
Please add working write code (e.g. how are you writing bytes to the StreamWriter). –  Richard Jun 14 '10 at 9:15
    
I agree with Richard, all that exception handling is irrelevant. All the relevant code is inside [Write to stream]. –  Henk Holterman Jun 14 '10 at 9:37
    
Are you able to step through the code in the debugger on the machine affected? How does the log you are writing to look like in the machine affected and how is it different (for the same input data) on other machines that are not affected? –  zespri Jun 14 '10 at 11:08
    
I wonder; is there any threading going on here? –  Marc Gravell Jun 14 '10 at 11:23
    
@Marc Gravell: valid concern. On one hand streamWriter = new StreamWriter(filename); uses FileShare.Read, thus locking the file for writing, so even in multi-threaded scenario we should never see incomplete data. On the other hand I've seen a lot of weirdness in multi-threaded scenarios that is not obvious at the beginning. Based on this I admit that if there is multi-threading here it is worth looking closely if it affects the described behaviour. –  zespri Jun 14 '10 at 12:08

1 Answer 1

There are two scenarios that leap to mind when talking about garbage at the end of a stream:

  1. not truncating when over-writing: if you overwrite a file but write less data, then you must truncate it. There is an overload to do this when opening the file, or you can use theStream.SetLength.
  2. writing buffer padding; in particular, the most common mistake is when using MemoryStream - you must either use .ToArray() (to get the correct number of bytes), or use .GetBuffer() but only copy .Length bytes out of the buffer (anything past that is garbage)

I'm guessing "1" applies here?

share|improve this answer
    
streamWriter = new StreamWriter(filename); uses FileMode.Create. This will always truncate the file. Do you know a scenario when this might not be true? –  zespri Jun 14 '10 at 11:06
    
I don't agree with @zespri. Taken from the docs, in the constructor of StreamWriter(String): If the file exists, it is overwritten; otherwise, a new file is created. –  Timores Jun 14 '10 at 11:17
    
@Timores - a quick check seems to show that it is overwritten and (correctly) truncated. So scratch that idea. –  Marc Gravell Jun 14 '10 at 11:30

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