Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C# you can use as to convert a type or get null:

Object o = Whatever();
String s = o as String;

Is there a similar easy way to achieve this in C++?

I'm using Visual Studio 2010, if that's important.

[Update]: Remember, there is a very important difference between casting and using as. Casting (at least in C#) will throw an exception if the type does not match:

Object o = null;
String s = (String)o; // Will crash.
share|improve this question
    
None of the answers suggesting using dynamic_cast are correct. The C# keyword is a conversion operation, but dynamic_cast is a cast. –  John Dibling Jun 14 '10 at 15:47
1  
@Jon Dibling - 'as' is a cast. it only succeeds if the cast is valid. –  sylvanaar Jun 14 '10 at 16:05
    
@sylvanaar: According to the C# spec, the cast operator and the as keyword both perform conversions. See 7.9.11 and 7.6.6 –  John Dibling Jun 14 '10 at 16:30
    
@John, they might technically not be 100% identical, but this was 100% what I was looking for, and it is working flawlessly. –  Sam Jun 15 '10 at 7:54
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

In C++, this would be a dynamic_cast, if you had a hierarchy where Object is the parent and String is the child.

Object * p = createMyObject();
String * s = dynamic_cast<String *>(p);
if(s)
{
  ...
}

Dynamic casting a pointer will return a pointer to the object if the cast is possible, or a null pointer if not.

Also, dynamic casting a reference will return a reference to the object if the cast is possible, or throw an exception.

share|improve this answer
4  
Your syntax is wrong. should be: dynamic_cast<String*>(p); and you should note that String must be derived from Object. –  anon Jun 14 '10 at 10:06
    
Indeed, I added the pointer. –  small_duck Jun 14 '10 at 10:11
3  
As an extension to what Neil said, there is no common base class that all classes in C++ automatically derive from. Some libraries do have such a central class, like Qt and wxWidgets, but these are explicitly derived from, either directly or through another class. –  blwy10 Jun 14 '10 at 10:14
    
C#'s as keyword is a conversion, not a cast. –  John Dibling Jun 14 '10 at 16:03
add comment

In C++ there is no base object class, so in general there is no way of doing this. You can however do it for specific hierarchies:

struct A {
   virtual ~A() {}
};

struct B : public A {
};

A * p = Something();     // Something() may return an A * or a B *
B & b = dynamic_cast <B&>(*p);

The dynamic cast will throw an exception if p does not point at something that can safely be converted to a B reference.

share|improve this answer
    
just to confirm, can we dynamic_cast on reference? –  Baiyan Huang Jun 14 '10 at 10:14
    
@Dbger We certainly can. –  anon Jun 14 '10 at 10:14
    
We should note the differences of casting a reference to casting a pointer. If the dynamic_cast fails: on a pointer then NULL is returned; on a reference an exception is thrown –  Loki Astari Jun 14 '10 at 12:28
add comment

Use dynamic_cast<type>(), but it will only work with pointers, not static objects.

share|improve this answer
4  
With pointers, you get a null pointer if the cast is invalid. It works with references, but throws an exception if invalid. –  Pontus Gagge Jun 14 '10 at 10:03
add comment

From what I can read from: C# Programmer's Reference: AS the as operator performs the same task as dynamic_cast in C++.

share|improve this answer
1  
No, it most definitely does not. C#'s as is a conversion. dynamic_cast is a cast. –  John Dibling Jun 14 '10 at 16:04
    
Considering this from the c# programmer's reference: The as operator is like a cast except that it yields null on conversion failure instead of raising an exception. And: expression as type is equivalent to: expression is type ? (type)expression : (type)null. I'd say the as operator is most resembling the dynamic_cast especially since as cannot perform user-defined conversions. –  TommyA Jun 14 '10 at 17:59
    
I understand this, but the question is about an equivalent operation in C++, so even though it is not important to distinguish between 'cast' and 'convert' in a language like C#, there is a big difference in C++. So it is important to be clear. You said yourself, "as is like a cast" -- not "as is as cast." And the C# spec is equally explicit: (7.6.6) : "A cast-expression is used to explicitly convert an expression to a given type" and (7.9.11) : "The as operator is used to explicitly convert a value to a given reference type or nullable type" These are conversions, not casts. –  John Dibling Jun 14 '10 at 20:40
    
An interesting note on the as keyword from the MSDN: C# for C++ Developers: The as keyword is similar to a standard cast, except that rather than throw an exception if the conversion fails, the return value is null. This is similar to using static_cast in C++, which, unlike dynamic_cast, performs no run-time check and hence does not throw an exception on failure. –  TommyA Jun 14 '10 at 22:14
add comment

In C# the as keyword converts a value to another type. There is code that supports this conversion (probably in the C# runtime). This is not a cast.

For the most part you can't use dynamic_cast or any other kind of cast in C++ to accomplish this, because casts and conversions are not the same thing. I say 'for the most part' because some types can be converted using static_cast, to convert an int to a float but this is still a conversion, not a cast. Also, if you have introduced a type system where everything is derived from an Object-like base class that has this conversion functionality, you might be able to construct a mechanism to support this conversion using dynamic_cast, but you would have had to write this mechanism and this does not seem to be what you're trying to do.

There is nothing built-in to C++ which will do this conversion for you; in other words, there is no C++ equivalent to the C# as keyword.

If you want to perform this conversion, you can often use streams:

#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    float f = 42.0f;
    stringstream ss;
    ss << f;
    string s = ss.str();
    cout << "Float: " << f << ", String '" << s << "'";

    return 0;
}

<sstream> is part of the C++ Standard, so in this regard you might consider it to be 'in the language'.

Using streams to do this conversion can be rather clumsy. Boost offers lexical_cast which can be used to perform these simple conversions with less code:

#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost\lexical_cast.hpp>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string s = "42";
    float f = boost::lexical_cast<float>(s);

    cout << "Float: " << f << ", String '" << s << "'";

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
What is the difference between casting and converting a reference type in c#? –  sylvanaar Jun 14 '10 at 16:07
    
@sylvanaar: In C# there seems to be no such thing as a true 'cast' in the C++ sense. In C++ a cast means "pretend variable x is of type Y", but according to the C# spec, (7.6.6) "A cast-expression is used to explicitly convert an expression to a given type." and (7.9.11) "The as operator is used to explicitly convert a value to a given reference type or nullable type. Unlike a cast expression (§7.6.6), the as operator never throws an exception. Instead, if the indicated conversion is not possible, the resulting value is null." –  John Dibling Jun 14 '10 at 16:26
    
@sylvanaar: If you downvoted my answer, you must think it is wrong. What, exactly, is wrong in my post? –  John Dibling Jun 14 '10 at 16:28
    
Why is using As on a reference type in c# not the same as using dynamic_cast on a pointer in C++? MS does mix their terms a little but the c# spec says "The as operator is like a cast operation. However, if the conversion is not possible, as returns null instead of raising an exception" I don't think you are correct in drawing such a strong distinction between cast/convert in this instance. But ill remove my downvote - just edit your post –  sylvanaar Jun 14 '10 at 20:28
    
@sylvanaar: The downvote isn't the issue. The correctness of as being a cast is what I'm taking issue with here. The spec is explicit: (7.6.6) : "A cast-expression is used to explicitly convert an expression to a given type" and (7.9.11) : "The as operator is used to explicitly convert a value to a given reference type or nullable type" These are conversions, not casts. –  John Dibling Jun 14 '10 at 20:41
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.