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I have setup svn on my server and Subclipse at home. I am the only developer and am mainly using it for the backup and versioning features.

Everytime I commit my changes I get eighter:

Out Of date errors

or

Tree conflicts

Sometimes I even delete files and they don't delete on svn, in a directory hierarchy only the very last item will delete so I have to delete each folder one at a time.

How do I avoid these errors in the future?

Update: Another problem I am having is that sometimes eclipse seems to sync with the server so that when I refactor a filename it goes off to the server and does something and makes me wait, which is annoying.

And for clarity, this is a typical operation: I might change a filename, move a file to a different folder then change the contents of a file. I select the 'Team menu' and click 'commit'. Then I get all these errors above.

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3 Answers 3

Do you always svn update before modifying your files? It is mandatory.

When deleting, you commit the deletion? Otherwise, you only delete in local

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No, I don't update. I just select the commit button. Can you tell me exactly what I should be doing? –  jax Jun 14 '10 at 11:32
    
Before any change, you must Right click -> Team -> Update To HEAD Otherwise, you might be modifying an already modified file –  Llistes Sugra Jun 14 '10 at 14:19
    
But how can it be modified as I am the only person updating? –  jax Jun 14 '10 at 15:28
    
If I have to run Update To HEAD every time this will really affect my efficiency also. Is this with every file, even if I change the contents? –  jax Jun 14 '10 at 15:30
    
If I rename a folder, it instead creates a new folder with a blue arrow and put the files inside the new folder, however, all subfolders are still under the old folder name???? –  jax Jun 14 '10 at 15:34

Aside from an update, you might also need to close & reopen the project to lose deleted files from the Synchronization view.

Don't try to do more than one delete, or make any other changes after a delete, before committing, either.

Great, isn't it.

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Peter is right, at least as far as I know the only way to delete a directory tree with Subclipse is delete the inner directory, commit, update, delete next, commit, update, etc. I might be missing something but at the very least there's an user-unfriendliness problem, I don't see why one can't delete a directory in one step. Mistyping a package name and realising later is awful.

I don't know how on earth subclipse got to version 1.6.x like this, especially because it's otherwise a good plugin...

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