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How can one easily test HTTP return codes, like, say, a 301 redirect?

For example, if I want to "see what's going on", I can use telnet to do something like this:

... $ telnet nytimes.com 80

Trying 199.239.136.200...
Connected to nytimes.com.
Escape character is '^]'.

GET / HTTP/1.0

(enter)

(enter)

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Server: Sun-ONE-Web-Server/6.1
Date: Mon, 14 Jun 2010 12:18:04 GMT
Content-type: text/html
Set-cookie: RMID=007af83f42dd4c161dfcce7d; expires=Tuesday, 14-Jun-2011 12:18:04 GMT; path=/; domain=.nytimes.com
Set-cookie: adxcs=-; path=/; domain=.nytimes.com
Set-cookie: adxcs=-; path=/; domain=.nytimes.com
Set-cookie: adxcs=-; path=/; domain=.nytimes.com
Expires: Thu, 01 Dec 1994 16:00:00 GMT
Cache-control: no-cache
Pragma: no-cache
Connection: close

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>    
<head>      
...

Which is an easy way to access quite some infos.

But now I want to test that a 301 redirect is indeed a 301 redirect.

How can I do so?

Basically, instead of getting a HTTP/1.1 200 OK I'd like to know how I can get the 301?

I know that I can enter the name of the URL in a browser and "see" that I'm redirected, but I'd like to know what tool(s) can be used to actually really "see" the 301 redirect.

Btw, I did test with a telnet, but when I enter www.example.org, which I redirected to example.org (without the www), all I can see is an "200 OK", I don't get to see the 301.

share|improve this question

A far more convenient solution in my opinion is to use Curl.

Simply run:

$ curl -I http://example.com

And it will return the HTTP headers like this

HTTP/1.1 302 Moved Temporarily
Server: nginx/1.1.19
Date: Sun, 21 Jul 2013 10:41:47 GMT
Content-Type: text/html
Content-Length: 161
Connection: keep-alive
Location: https://other.example.com/
share|improve this answer

The Firefox addon HTTP Live headers is quite useful for that.

share|improve this answer
    
ah interesting, thanks for that link... However I was looking for something more "low level", like telnet :) Funnily I found a way to get my 301 two minutes after posting the question :) – NoozNooz42 Jun 14 '10 at 13:06

In the headers (of the telnet response) you'll see it in the first line:

HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Via: XXXXXXXXXXX
Connection: close
Proxy-Connection: close
Content-Length: 0
Date: Mon, 14 Jun 2010 13:03:14 GMT
Location: /xxxxxxxxx
Server: XXXXXXX
Cache-Control: private

Thanks

share|improve this answer
    
actually you don't in the way I showed in the question, which was the whole point of my question :) Look at my answer to see why it wasn't working in the way I was trying using telnet and what needs to be done to make it work :) – NoozNooz42 Jun 14 '10 at 13:09
    
You didn't had the 301 on the first line because it wasn't one. If the "www" version does it but not the "non-www" version, it's not the problem of telnet nor my answer. it's because one of the two URL does it and the other not. These are 2 different URLs. – Mike Gleason jr Couturier Jun 14 '10 at 13:37

I use Firebug's Net panel for this.

alt text

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK, two minutes after answering the question I found the answer...

Doing the following doesn't work:

telnet www.example.org 80
GET / HTTP/1.0
{enter}
{enter}

But the following works fine:

telnet example.org 80
GET / HTTP/1.0
Host: www.example.org
{enter}
{enter}

My error was to pass www.example.org to telnet (instead of example.org) and then not specifying any "Host: ".

Now it works, I get this:

Connected to xxx.xx
Escape character is '^]'.
GET / HTTP/1.0
Host: www.example.org

HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Server: Apache-Coyote/1.1
Location: http://example.org/
Connection: close
Date: Mon, 14 Jun 2010 13:02:22 GMT
Connection: close

Connection closed by foreign host.

Note: On Windows Vista/7, Telnet Client is not installed by default. To install it, follow the directions here: Install Telnet Client - Microsoft TechNet

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work on windows 7 – Krunal Sep 7 '12 at 5:46

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