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Can some post the way to know if a particular user is a deactivated user in the windows ad ?

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+1 It is always interesting to find Active Directory related questions throughout SO. =) –  Will Marcouiller Jun 14 '10 at 14:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you're on .NET 3.5 or can upgrade to .NET 3.5 - have a look at the new System.DirectoryServices.AccountManagement namespace which makes lots of these operations a breeze. See Managing Directory Security Principals in the .NET Framework 3.5 for an intro.

In your case, you could write your code something like this:

PrincipalContext ctx = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, "YOURDOMAIN")

UserPrincipal user = UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity("somename");

bool locked = user.IsAccountLockedOut();

That's all there is! Most of those everyday operations on users and groups have been vastly improved with .NET 3.5 - use those new capabilities!

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That was what I was looking for ! Thanks ! –  abmv Jun 15 '10 at 6:16

Here's a good link for AD operations Howto: (Almost) Everything In Active Directory via C#

You need to query the userAccountControl property, it's a bitwise flag and I believe it's 514 for a disabled account but the values are cumulative so you'd need to work it out. (NORMAL ACCOUNT + ACCOUNT DISABLED = 512 + 2 = 514).

Here's the reference for all of the User Account Control flags.

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+1 Thanks for your kind explanation given in comment to my answer. We both have a good answer. =) –  Will Marcouiller Jun 14 '10 at 14:44

You need to query the userAccountControl property.

Values for userAccountControl flags are:

    CONST   HEX
    -------------------------------
    SCRIPT 0x0001
    ACCOUNTDISABLE 0x0002
    HOMEDIR_REQUIRED 0x0008
    LOCKOUT 0x0010
    PASSWD_NOTREQD 0x0020
    PASSWD_CANT_CHANGE 0x0040
    ENCRYPTED_TEXT_PWD_ALLOWED 0x0080
    TEMP_DUPLICATE_ACCOUNT 0x0100
    NORMAL_ACCOUNT 0x0200
    INTERDOMAIN_TRUST_ACCOUNT 0x0800
    WORKSTATION_TRUST_ACCOUNT 0x1000
    SERVER_TRUST_ACCOUNT 0x2000
    DONT_EXPIRE_PASSWORD 0x10000
    MNS_LOGON_ACCOUNT 0x20000
    SMARTCARD_REQUIRED 0x40000
    TRUSTED_FOR_DELEGATION 0x80000
    NOT_DELEGATED 0x100000
    USE_DES_KEY_ONLY 0x200000
    DONT_REQ_PREAUTH 0x400000
    PASSWORD_EXPIRED 0x800000
    TRUSTED_TO_AUTH_FOR_DELEGATION 0x1000000

You would need to work with the System.DirectoryServices namespace and use the DirectorySearcher class in order to query the Active Directory, then verify for the userAccountControl flag property.

A good page I guess you should consult is the following:

How to (almost) everything in Active Directory in C#.

You'll have to go bitwise when comparing against the userAccountControl flags property such as follows:

using (DirectorySearcher searcher = new DirectorySearcher()) {
    searcher.SearchRoot = new DirectoryEntry(rootDSE); // Where rootDSE is a string which contains your LDAP path to your domain.
    searcher.SearchScope = SearchScope.Subtree;
    searcher.Filter = string.Format("(&(objectClass=user)(sAMAccountName={0}))", userName);

    SearchResult result = null;

    try {
        result = searcher.FindOne();
    } catch (Exception) {
        // You know what to do here... =P
    }

    if (result == null)
        return;

    DirectoryEntry user = result.GetDirectoryEntry();

    bool isAccountDisabled = ((user.Properties("userAccountControl").Value & ACCOUNTDISABLE) == ACCOUNTDISABLE);
}

Did this help anyhow?

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@David Neale: How is it stolen? I referenced where I got the information. Plus, there's always MSDN over there. I have worked and still do with Active Directory lately. I don't get what you're saying here. –  Will Marcouiller Jun 14 '10 at 13:27
    
It was initially because your answer had been edited and then directly resembled mine. You've now taken the time to compile a good comprehensive answer so I retract it. :) –  David Neale Jun 14 '10 at 14:13
    
@David Neale: Thanks for this kind explanation. I do so because when typing the entire answer, it is too long for the OP to get his answer. I then come in with a short but direct answer, then I edit it afterward to bring more comprehensive details, etc. Many people do so, so that they keep the "first to answer" rank, if you see what I mean. Anyway, you got a very good answer that I shall upvote. =) –  Will Marcouiller Jun 14 '10 at 14:43

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