Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to debug print an LPCWSTR string, but I get a problem during the sprintf push in the buffer, because it retrieve only the first character from the string. Here is the code:

HANDLE WINAPI hookedCreateFileW(LPCWSTR lpFileName, DWORD dwDesiredAccess, DWORD dwShareMode, LPSECURITY_ATTRIBUTES lpSecurityAttributes, DWORD dwCreationDisposition, DWORD dwFlagsAndAttributes, HANDLE hTemplateFile) {
 char buffer[1024];
 sprintf_s(buffer, 1024, "CreateFileW: %s", lpFileName);
 OutputDebugString(buffer); 
 return trueCreateFileW(lpFileName, dwDesiredAccess, dwShareMode, lpSecurityAttributes, dwFlagsAndAttributes, dwCreationDisposition, hTemplateFile);
}

For example I get "CreateFileW: C" or "CreateFileW: \". How do I properly push it in the buffer?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
1  
Shouldn't you use the wide-char version: wsprintf_s? –  AraK Jun 14 '10 at 14:06

3 Answers 3

Use swprintf_s which is the version of sprintf_s which is designed for wide-character strings.

You'll also need an array of wchar_t instead of char and to use OutputDebugStringW()

Also, note you that swprintf_w might not be entierly what you want to call. If it encounters a string that is longer than the size you give it, it executes some sort of assertion. I suggest you test this situation specifically.

share|improve this answer

Unless you have a concrete reason to target unicode in this single function (and not, say, in your entire project), it might be wise to use charset-agnostic macros wherever possible:

HANDLE WINAPI hookedCreateFile(LPCTSTR lpFileName, DWORD dwDesiredAccess, DWORD dwShareMode, LPSECURITY_ATTRIBUTES lpSecurityAttributes, DWORD dwCreationDisposition, DWORD dwFlagsAndAttributes, HANDLE hTemplateFile) {
 TCHAR buffer[1024];
 _stprintf_s(buffer, 1024, _T("CreateFileW: %s"), lpFileName);
 OutputDebugString(buffer); 
 return trueCreateFile(lpFileName, dwDesiredAccess, dwShareMode, lpSecurityAttributes, dwFlagsAndAttributes, dwCreationDisposition, hTemplateFile);
}
share|improve this answer

You need to tell sprintf() that you pass a wide character string. Use the %ls specifier:

 sprintf_s(buffer, 1024, "CreateFileW: %ls", lpFileName);

Do note how unproductive this is. Your code runs on a Unicode operating system. It must convert your char[] string back to a wide string before it can send it to the debugger. That's just wasted CPU cycles with a significant risk of data loss to boot. When you are in Rome, act like a Roman and use wchar_t + wsprintf(). And #define UNICODE so you'll automatically call the fast OutputDebugStringW(), the one that doesn't have to convert the string. The point of using C++ is to write fast code, intentionally making is slow is pointless.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.