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someone can tell me why this is incorrect as a singleton pattern:

class preSingleton(object):
    def __call__(self):
        return self

singleton = preSingleton()

# singleton is actually the singleton

a = singleton()
b = singleton()

print a==b  

a.var_in_a = 100
b.var_in_b = 'hello'

print a.var_in_b
print b.var_in_a

Edit: The above code prints:

True
hello
100

thank you very much

Part Two

Maybe this is better?

class Singleton(object):
    def __new__(cls):
        return cls

a = Singleton()
b = Singleton()

print a == b

a.var_in_a = 100
b.var_in_b = 'hello'

print a.var_in_b
print b.var_in_a

Edit: The above code prints:

True
hello
100

Thanks again.

share|improve this question
    
Could should show us the output of the print statements ? –  Tom Jun 14 '10 at 14:12
1  
Please use id(a) and id(b) to check the identity of the objects. Please provide the actual output. –  S.Lott Jun 14 '10 at 14:20

6 Answers 6

Singletons are actually really simple to make in Python. The trick is to have the module do your encapsulation for you and not make a class.

  • The module will only be initialized once
  • The module will not be initialized until the first time it is imported
  • Any attempts to re-import the module will return a pointer to the existing import

And if you want to pretend that the module is an instance of a class, you can do the following

import some_module
class SomeClass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.singleton = some_module
share|improve this answer

Because this is not a singleton. Singleton must be single, your object is not.

>>> class preSingleton(object):
...     def __call__(self):
...         return self
...
>>> singleton = preSingleton()
>>> singleton2 = preSingleton()
>>> singleton
<__main__.preSingleton object at 0x00C6D410>
>>> singleton2
<__main__.preSingleton object at 0x00C6D290>
share|improve this answer
    
The PreSingleton isn't the singleton, the singleton is. You're misunderstanding the code. –  Skilldrick Jun 14 '10 at 14:19
    
no I didn't misunderstand. Neither are singletons. If you run the code like that twice, you will get different instances, period. –  unbeli Jun 14 '10 at 14:21
    
@Skilldrick singleton is an instance of preSingleton. It is not a class and hence cannot be said to follow Singleton pattern. Otherwise in that sense, every instance of a class is a singleton in itself. –  Abhinav Sarkar Jun 14 '10 at 14:22
    
I know, but when you 'call' singleton, it returns an object. If singleton were a class, and you 'called' it, it would return an object. To all intents and purposes, singleton is acting as a singleton. –  Skilldrick Jun 14 '10 at 14:25
1  
Ok, then any variable is a singleton. You just get a value and it's always the same, whoa, singleton! –  unbeli Jun 14 '10 at 14:29

This is actualy the Borg pattern. Multiple objects that share state.

That's not to say there's anything wrong with it, and for most if not all use cases it's functionaly equivalent to a singleton, but since you asked...

edit: Of course since they're Borg objects, each instance uses up more memory so if you're creating tons of them this will make a difference to resource usage.

share|improve this answer

Here's a sexy little singleton implemented as a decorator:

def singleton(cls):
    """Decorate a class with @singleton when There Can Be Only One."""
    instance = cls()
    instance.__call__ = lambda: instance
    return instance

Use it like this:

@singleton
class MySingleton:
    def spam(self):
        print id(self)

What happens is that outside of the class definition, MySingleton will actually refer to the one and only instance of the class that exists, and you'll be left with no mechanism for creating any new instances. Calling MySingleton() will simply return the exact same instance. For example:

>>> MySingleton
<__main__.MySingleton instance at 0x7f474b9265a8>
>>> MySingleton()
<__main__.MySingleton instance at 0x7f474b9265a8>
>>> MySingleton() is MySingleton
True
>>> MySingleton.spam()
139944187291048
>>> MySingleton().spam()
139944187291048
share|improve this answer
    
Elaborating strategies for implementing singleton classes in Python is just like trying to sell ice-creams in Murmansk in the middle of January. "Singletons" are simply realized by creating a module instance... please have a look at the explanation from unholysampler above. –  Christophe Apr 11 at 13:12
    
I disagree, using module has some disadvantages. For example, if you want to share state between two methods in your singleton, you'd then need to do that with a module global variable, which gets ugly (functions wanting to set that variable would have to call global your_variable). Also, I have a number of small singletons that I use for different purposes. They're much nicer to define as a few classes in a single module rather than all separate modules, because they're just too small to stand as modules on their own. –  Robru Apr 13 at 20:31

I don't see the problem (if it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck...). Looks like a singleton to me.

It works differently from a Java singleton (for example) because Python uses the same syntax to call a function as to create a new instance of an object. So singleton() is actually calling the singleton object, which returns itself.

share|improve this answer

You can do this with your class:

>>> class preSingleton(object):
...     def __call__(self):
...         return self
...
>>> x = preSingleton()
>>> y = preSingleton()
>>> x == y
False

So, more than one instances of the class can be created and it violates the Singleton pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
preSingleton isn't the singleton, singleton is. –  Skilldrick Jun 14 '10 at 14:37

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