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I did ask a question before. The answer made sense, but I could never get it to work. And now I gotta get it working. But I cannot figure out BASH's if statements. What am I doing wrong below:

START_TIME=9
STOP_TIME=17
HOUR=$((`date +"%k"`))
if [[ "$HOUR" -ge "9" ]] && [[ "$HOUR" -le "17" ]] && [[ "$2" != "-force" ]] ; then
    echo "Cannot run this script without -force at this time"
    exit 1
fi

The idea is that I don't want this script to continue executing, unless forced to, during hours of 9am to 5pm. But it will always evaluate the condition to true and thus won't allow me to run the script.

./script.sh [action] (-force)

Thx

Edit: The output of set -x:

$ ./test2.sh restart
+ START_TIME=9
+ STOP_TIME=17
++ date +%k
+ HOUR=11
+ [[ 11 -ge 9 ]]
+ [[ 11 -le 17 ]]
+ [[ '' != \-\f\o\r\c\e ]]
+ echo 'Cannot run this script without -force at this time'
Cannot run this script without -force at this time
+ exit 1

and then with -force

$ ./test2.sh restart -force
+ START_TIME=9
+ STOP_TIME=17
++ date +%k
+ HOUR=11
+ [[ 11 -ge 9 ]]
+ [[ 11 -le 17 ]]
+ [[ '' != \-\f\o\r\c\e ]]
+ echo 'Cannot run this script without -force at this time'
Cannot run this script without -force at this time
+ exit 1
share|improve this question
    
What version of bash are you using? It works fine on mine: 3.2.49. –  Amardeep Jun 14 '10 at 15:12
    
It's GNU bash, version 3.2.39(1)-release (i686-pc-linux-gnu). I feel really stupid that the above won't work. Always goes into error mode. Have no idea why. –  Daniil Jun 14 '10 at 15:21
    
"error mode" - What do you mean by that? Is there an error message? –  Dennis Williamson Jun 14 '10 at 15:27
    
I meant, it always evaluates the condition to true and asks to use -force (from running script POV that would be error mode). –  Daniil Jun 14 '10 at 15:36
    
I just noticed, on the second run with -force parameter. "$2" is getting evaluated to blank for some reason. Is force a reserved word in bash of sorts? –  Daniil Jun 14 '10 at 15:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
#!/bin/bash
START_TIME=9
STOP_TIME=17
HOUR=$(date +"%k")
if (( $HOUR >= $START_TIME && $HOUR <= $STOP_TIME )) && [[ "$2" != "-force" ]] ; then
    echo "Cannot run this script without -force at this time"
    exit 1
fi
share|improve this answer
    
Note that having STOP_TIME set to 17 will prevent the script from running all the way until 17:59. You may need to change that if you want to be able to run it during the interval 17:00-17:59 (inclusive) or test for hours and minutes for more precision. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 14 '10 at 15:12
    
OK - it seems to be working. Yes, I don't want to have that script executed up until 6pm, hence the <= 17. Big thanks! But can you explain what I was doing wrong? Just feeling very stupid that cannot figure out what seems to be the simplest possible task. –  Daniil Jun 14 '10 at 15:19
    
I can't see any reason why your version doesn't work. Add set -x right before that section and set +x right after and edit your question to show the resulting output. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 14 '10 at 15:30

Use -a instead of &&:

if [ $HOUR -ge $START_TIME -a $HOUR -le $STOP_TIME -a "_$2" != "_-force" ]; then
    echo "Cannot run without -force at this hour"
    exit 1
fi
share|improve this answer
    
Your code is OK since all the values are known, controlled, or guarded, but, in general, it is better to use either [[ … -a … ]] or [ … ] && [ … ]. See the Application Usage section of the [POSIX specification for test ](opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/utilities/test.html). The problem is that [ … ] can be confused by values that look like operators since it parses for operators after expansion (because it was originally an external command), but [[ … ]] can parse for operators before expansion (because it is defined as built-in to the shells that support it). –  Chris Johnsen Jun 14 '10 at 20:26

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