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I'm working with PreparedStatement with MySQL server.

example:

String myQuery = "select id from user where name = ?";
PreparedStatement stmt  = sqlConnection.prepareStatement(myQuery);
stmt.setString(1, "test");
stmt.executeQUery();
ResultSet rs = stmt.getResultSet();

How can I receive the full SQL query that is about to be executed on the MySQL server?

thanks!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's not mandated by the JDBC spec, but several JDBC drivers let the toString of a PreparedStatement return sort-of the query that will be run, and MySQL's Connector/J happens to have this behavior (or at least it did a few years ago).

String myQuery = "select id from user where name = ?";
PreparedStatement stmt  = sqlConnection.prepareStatement(myQuery);
stmt.setString(1, "test");
System.out.println(stmt); // May do what you want!
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thank you! stmt.toString() resolved the issue. –  ufk Jun 14 '10 at 16:03
    
If stmt.toString() doesn't work, try following the solution provided in this article: javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-01-2002/… –  A Costa Aug 7 '13 at 13:10

You cannot really get out the query that will be executed but there are logging APIs that will log database calls for you such as log4jdbc and p6spy.

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You can't, as Java isn't responsible for constructing it. Prepared statements are supported within MySQL, so Java sends the actual parameterized SQL ("select id from user where name = ?") straight to MySQL along with the parameters

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Actually some JDBC drivers do the work on the client side and send a fully-parameterized query to the server (I don't know which way the MySQL driver uses). There is no standardized way to get the "complete" SQL statement anyway. –  Joachim Sauer Jun 14 '10 at 15:37
    
@Joachim Sauer: MySQL Connector/J 3.1 and newer will user server-side prepared statements. –  Powerlord Jun 14 '10 at 15:41

I can tell you what it is. If you're using MySQL 4.1 or newer with Connector/J 3.1 or newer, it will be something like:

PREPARE stmt FROM 'select id from user where name = ?'
SET @a = 'test'
EXECUTE stmt USING @a

This is because MySQL supports server-side prepared statements.

(More likely it uses the binary protocol, but this code is just to make a point)

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