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So, after a while of researching what SVN system should I use, I end up creating a project in Google Code.. thing is, that ANYONE can have access to my repository, and is NOT what I want :)

So, I'm looking for a "private Google Code" code hosting web.

I found out that Bitbucket and Assembla are good, but.. any opinions?

Thank you!

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5 Answers 5

Keep in mind, BitBucket utilizes Mercurial for Source Control, NOT Subversion. Granted, Mercurial might be a nice step up to use and learn, but that's a discussion for another answer. Also, BitBucket will limit you to one, free, private repository.

I've used Assembla in the past and they've been okay, nothing particularly special.

There is also the option of running your own Subversion server, which can be extremely easy on Windows by using VisualSVN Server. Sign up for a dynamic-dns account, and you can easily point a hostname back to your home computer.

Lastly, I just noticed, but my Dreamhost hosting account comes with the ability to create Subversion repositories, and it's pretty cheap and comes with a domain name.

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The problem with VisualSVN is that VisualSVN Client is not a standalone installation, it needs to be installed over Visual Studio, and.. I'm using Flex (Actionscript) –  Artemix Jun 17 '10 at 3:34
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You don't need to use the VisualSVN Client with the Server part, it's just available if you want it. I'm more of a TortoiseSVN guy anyway. –  MattGWagner Jun 17 '10 at 14:55
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Bitbucket uses also Git for source control. –  hipertracker Jun 9 '13 at 7:03

No SSL, max 2 devs, max 200MB, rock solid.

http://unfuddle.com/about/tour/plans

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Assembla has changed over the years. The integration of the ticketing tool and the SCM tools is far more extensive than in past years. Now there is Code Review and Merge Requests for git that allow you to share code between branches or repositories. Soon SVN will also have these functionalities.

With 30 day free trials, there is little to lose. You can even get a free svn repository without the other tools to keep your code private, but for the $9/month, I think the ticketing tool is well worth the money.

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If you want a private SVN repository, you'll most likely need to pay (at least a little) for the service.

There are many commercial SVN hosts - most do a fairly good job. I've personally had very good luck with wush.net, which is inexpensive and allows you to setup encrypted only access to SVN (and Trac, if desired), restricted to specific users.

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Beanstalk offers a limited free account:

We also offer a FREE account with 3 users, 1 private repository (Git or SVN) and 100 MB of space.

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I've just visited this link, and coming from StackOverflow, Beanstalk offers 20% of discount for the first month of service. Interesting, but still a bit expensive IMHO. –  Nicolás Feb 29 '12 at 0:26

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