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I have been reading Exceptional C++ by Herb Sutter. On reaching Item 32

I found the following

 namespace A 
 {
     struct X;
     struct Y;
     void f( int );
     void g( X );
 }
 namespace B
 {
     void f( int i )
     {
        f( i );   // which f()?
     }
 }

This f() calls itself, with infinite recursion. The reason is that the only visible f() is B::f() itself.

There is another function with signature f(int), namely the one in namespace A. If B had written "using namespace A;" or "using A::f;", then A::f(int) would have been visible as a candidate when looking up f(int), and the f(i) call would have been ambiguous between A::f(int) and B::f(int). Since B did not bring A::f(int) into scope, however, only B::f(int) can be considered, so the call unambiguously resolves to B::f(int).

But when I did the following..

 namespace A 
 {
     struct X;
     struct Y;
     void f( int );
     void g( X );
 }
 namespace B
 {
     using namespace A;
     void f( int i )
     {
        f( i );   // No error, why?
     }
 }

That means Herb Sutter has got it all wrong? If not why dont I get an error?

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1  
Just because something isn't a compile-time error doesn't mean it has well-defined semantics. – Carl Norum Jun 14 '10 at 18:04
1  
But writing using A::f leads to compile time error. – Gautam Kumar Jun 14 '10 at 18:05
1  
Depending on your version of the book, it is up to 11 years old. Any changes in C++03, and soon in C++0x, will not be reflected in its examples. (I don't know, but I suspect this worked when he first wrote it.) – Bill Jun 14 '10 at 18:32
up vote 17 down vote accepted

There's a subtle difference between a using declaration (using A::f) and a using directive (using namespace A).

A using declaration introduces a name into the scope in which it is used so using A::f makes the call to f in the definition of B::f(int) ambiguous.

A using definition makes members of the namespace visible in the scope in which it is used, but they appear as if the name comes from the nearest common scope of the namespace introduced and the namespace in which the using directive was used. This means that using namespace A; in this case make the other f appear as if it was declared at the global scope but it is still hidden by B::f(int).

(ISO/IEC/BS 14882:2003 7.3.4 [namespace.udir] / 1 for all the standard junkies.)

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