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Can <probing> privatePath be configured from a web.config located in a subdirectory of the root webapp? The subdirectory is not a virtual directory.

In my case, I want my webapp in ~/MyApp to reference a private assembly in the ~/MyApp/bin folder. According to the Microsoft documentation, it seems like this is possible in my environment, but I can't get it to work:

  • my app is setup in ~/MyApp.
  • I don't have write access to the root.
  • I only have FTP access to the server (i.e., I am not an IIS admin and I can't login to the machine)
  • I am trying to use FCKeditor in my subdir application

Here is my folder structure:

/
| -MyApp
| | - Bin
| | | *FredCK.FCKeditorV2.dll
| | *Default.aspx
| | *web.config

Here is the <runtime> section of ~/MyApp/web.config:

  <runtime>
    <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
        <probing privatePath="MyApp;MyApp/bin" />
    </assemblyBinding>
 </runtime>

I've tried all sorts of things to get to work. In the Fusion logs, my privatePath dirs don't shows up in the probing paths.

share|improve this question
    
@Bago: it's "ASP.NET", one word. – John Saunders Jun 14 '10 at 19:51
    
You seem to have a closing but non-opening dependantAssembly tag – menssana Jun 10 '14 at 19:29

you could also add it to the GAC, making it accessible to all apps..

of course this would ignore the major question, which is why are you trying to hack your own server like that :)

share|improve this answer
    
installing in the GAC requires admin access to the machine, but not IIS.. it has nothing to do with IIS. – Sonic Soul Jun 15 '10 at 4:16
2  
Right, thanks for the clarification. I only have FTP access to the server, so installing to the GAC or configuring virtual directories is out of the question, right? – Bago Jun 15 '10 at 12:56
    
that is correct. – Sonic Soul Jun 15 '10 at 14:01

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