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I have a table of WorkOrders. The table has a PrimaryWorker & PrimaryPay field. It also has a SecondaryWorker & SecondaryPay field (which can be null).

I wish to run 2 very similar queries & union them so that it will return a Worker Field & Pay field. So if a single WorkOrder record had both the PrimaryWorker and SecondaryWorker field populated I would get 2 records back.

The "where clause" part of these 2 queries is very similar and long to construct. Here's a dummy example

var q = ctx.WorkOrder.Where(w => w.WorkDate >= StartDt && w.WorkDate <= EndDt);

if(showApprovedOnly)
{
   q = q.Where(w => w.IsApproved);
}
//...more filters applied

Now I also have a search flag called hideZeroPay. If that's true I don't want to include the record if the worker was payed $0. But obviously for 1 query I need to compare the PrimaryPay field and in the other I need to compare the SecondaryPay field.

So I'm wondering how to do this.

Can I clone my base query q and make a primary & secondary worker query out of it and then union those 2 queries together?

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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Hmm, I'm not sure that I understand you intention. But I think cloning is not neccessary. Why don't you split two new queries from your base query?


var baseQuery = ctx.WorkOrder.Where(w => w.WorkDate >= StartDt && w.WorkDate <= EndDt);

IQueryable<WorkOrder> query1;
if (showApprovedOnly)
{
  query1 = baseQuery.Where(w => w.IsApproved);
}
//more filters on query1
...

IQueryable<WorkOrder> query2;
if (/*something*/)
  query2 = baseQuery.Where(w => w.SomeThing);

After defining your queries you can interpret them (per enumeration) and retrieve your different results.


var res1 = query1.ToList();
var res2 = query2.ToList();

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Oh! For some reason I was thinking I was always adding to the same query object, but you're saying it is infact a new distinct query object returned eachtime you call a linq function like where().. like how String.Substring() returs a new String & not the same one modified? If that's the case that's great. How is the best way to return the union of query1 & query2? Ideally I'd like it to all run on the database. –  user169867 Jun 14 '10 at 23:55
    
After thinking about it, I've to say that your thoughts came up too. The reason is the ObjectQuery object. Well when I was writing my answer I just was guessing but now I know that it works. I don't know if a .Union() is executed on the database. But I'm interested on your results, after you have tried it. ;o) –  DHN Jun 15 '10 at 8:13
    
Yeah, it does seem you get a new ObjectQuery back each time because query1.equals(query2) returns false. I noticed that I had to perform my projection ( Select() ) on each query before calling Union() for it to work properly. I then ran a ToTraceString() on the ObjectQuery and it does all apear to run on the DB. –  user169867 Jun 15 '10 at 12:27
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When you do your second Where you are actually cloning your query.

Here you create your initial queryable object.

var q = ctx.WorkOrder.Where(w => w.WorkDate >= StartDt && w.WorkDate <= EndDt);

Here you create a new queryable with the where associated

if(showApprovedOnly)
{
   q = q.Where(w => w.IsApproved);
}
//...more filters applied

All you need to do is create a new variable to store the ammended query.

var qw = q.Where(w=> w.IsApproved);

This works because the queryable is created as an object and the query itself is only run once you enumerate it.

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