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I was wondering why shared_ptr doesn't have an implicit constructor. The fact it doesn't is alluded to here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/142391/getting-a-boostsharedptr-for-this

(I figured out the reason but thought it would be a fun question to post anyway.)

#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
#include <iostream>

using namespace boost;
using namespace std;

void fun(shared_ptr<int> ptr) {
    cout << *ptr << endl;
}

int main() {
    int foo = 5;
    fun(&foo);
    return 0;
}

/* shared_ptr_test.cpp: In function `int main()':
 * shared_ptr_test.cpp:13: conversion from `int*' to non-scalar type `
 *  boost::shared_ptr<int>' requested */
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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In this case, the shared_ptr would attempt to free your stack allocated int. You wouldn't want that, so the explicit constructor is there to make you think about it.

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The logical reason is that:

  • calling the delete operator is not implicit in C++
  • the creation of any owning smart pointer (shared_whatever, scoped_whatever, ...) is really a (delayed) call to the delete operator
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I think there is no reason to have explicit in this constructor.

Mentioned examples with incorrect using of offset address operator (&) make no sense since there is no place to use such operator in modern C++. Except only such idiomatic code in assignment/comparision operator as 'this == &other' and maybe some test code.

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@vBx: in mentioned example 1 offset address operator (&) has been used to pass parameter by pointer to function. Should use reference instead. –  V_V Jun 4 '11 at 10:19
    
operator& gives the address, not the "offset" (whatever that means) of a lvalue. –  curiousguy Oct 7 '11 at 14:34
int main() {

    int foo = 5;
    fun(&foo);

    cout << foo << endl; // ops!!

    return 0;
}
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1  
I don't see how it is fundamentally different from delete &foo; –  curiousguy Oct 7 '11 at 14:40

Long time lurker, and a 3rd year soft eng student here, Haphazard guess would be, to stop you from attempting to convert a 'natural' pointer to a shared_ptr, then deallocing the pointed object, without the shared_ptr knowing about the dealloc.

(Also, reference counting problems blah blah).

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