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As part of an ongoing process of trying to upgrade my C++ skills, I am trying to break some old habits. My old school C programmer inclination is to write this;

void func( Widget &ref )
{
    Widget w;  // default constructor
    int i;
    for( i=0; i<10; i++ )
    {
        w = ref;  // assignment operator 
        // do stuff that modifies w
    }
}

This works well. But I think the following is closer to best practice;

void func( Widget &ref )
{
    for( int i=0; i<10; i++ )
    {
        Widget w = ref; // ??
        // do stuff that modifies w
    }
}

With my Widget class at least, this works fine. But I don't fully understand why. I have two theories;

1) The copy constructor runs 10 times.
2) The copy constructor runs once then the assignment operator runs 9 times.

Both of these trouble me a little. 2) in particular seems artificial and wrong. Is there a third possibility that I am missing ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Of course the copy constructor runs 10 times! When you iterate the for(;;) cycle, at each iteration the variables declared inside the braces will go out of scope. If Widget has a destructor, it will be called 10 times (possible performance hit).

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1  
Ok I believe it is obvious to you. To me it wasn't obvious because I think of the contructor as something that constructs something that doesn't exist. –  Bill Forster Jun 14 '10 at 23:47
    
When you have this kind of doubts, my suggestion is to write small test programs that output some console output in constructors and in destructors, so the actual program flow will be clear. I still use this technique when I have doubts. –  Lorenzo Jun 14 '10 at 23:51
    
That's what I normally do too. This time I spent half an hour perusing Lippman instead. And when I couldn't find an explanation of this apparently simple issue, I thought it was worth sharing the question. I thought that was what the site was for. –  Bill Forster Jun 14 '10 at 23:57
    
Thanks for your extra explanation in the body of your answer. With that it now seems obvious to me too so +1. –  Bill Forster Jun 15 '10 at 0:00
1  
You cannot draw any general, meaningful conclusions about the C++ language from assembly code that a particular compiler chooses to spit out. For example, people often talk about vtables and vptrs, but there is no such thing in the C++ language. Anyway, both our "theories" lead to the same conclusion, so no big deal I guess :) –  FredOverflow Jun 15 '10 at 8:36

Your first theory is correct: the copy constructor is invoked ten times. This:

Widget w = ref;

is (almost) the same as:

Widget w(ref);

The first is called copy initialization; the second is called direct initialization. Both invoke the copy constructor. The main difference between the two is that the first is invalid if the copy constructor is declared explicit, while the second is valid so long as there is an accessible copy constructor.

You can verify this by declaring and defining both a copy constructor and a copy assignment operator for Widget, and seeing how many times each is called.

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Thank you very much. –  Bill Forster Jun 14 '10 at 23:53
    
James I am going to "unaccept" this and accept Lorenzo's answer. I hesitated about doing this as I hate rudeness. But I hit on a solution, I've browsed your answers and upvoted some of them so you get a net win anyway. I discovered you have provided many succinct, grammatical and useful answers, well done. Reviewing an expert's answers turns out to be educational, I will do this more! Why the unaccept/accept? Well the thing that was confusing me was that I didn't understand how something that already exists can be constructed. Lorenzo addresses that. I don't blame you for not reading my mind! –  Bill Forster Jun 15 '10 at 23:59
    
@Bill: It's not rude at all :-) I'm just glad you got your question answered. That's all that really matters. –  James McNellis Jun 16 '10 at 0:03

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