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I have this code example, but I don't understand why changing the values in the array inside outputUsingArray() are changing the original array.

I would have expected changing the values of the array in outputUsingArray() would only be for a local copy of the array.

Why isn't that so?

However, this is the behaviour I would like, but I don't understand why it work.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
void outputUsingArray(int array[][4], int n_rows, int n_cols) {
  int i, j;

  printf("Output Using array\n");
  for (i = 0; i < n_rows; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < n_cols; j++) {
      // Either can be used.
      //printf("%2d ", array[i][j] );
      printf("%2d ", *(*(array+i)+j));
    }
    printf("\n");
  }
  printf("\n");

  array[0][0] = 100;
  array[2][3] = 200;

}

void outputUsingPointer(int (*array)[4], int n_rows, int n_cols) {
  int i, j;

  printf("Output Using Pointer to Array i.e. int (*array)[4]\n");
  for (i = 0; i < n_rows; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < n_cols; j++) {
      printf("%2d ", *(*(array+i) + j ));
    }
    printf("\n");
  }
  printf("\n");
}

int main() {

  int array[3][4] = { { 0, 1, 2, 3 },
              { 4, 5, 6, 7 },
              { 8, 9, 10, 11 } };

  outputUsingPointer((int (*)[4])array, 3, 4);

  outputUsingArray(array, 3, 4);

  printf("0,0: %i\n", array[0][0]);
  printf("2,3: %i\n", array[2][3]);

  return 0;
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

passing int[] is really passing the pointer to the first element of the array.
passing int* is passing the pointer to the first element of the array as well.

They're identical.

Since they're both pointing towards the same part of memory, changing one will change the other one.

share|improve this answer
    
and it works since array is a pointer to int[4] so it has a fixed size the compiler knows about so it can do index calculations –  Spudd86 Jun 15 '10 at 17:58
    
@Spudd86: No, this is not true. No index or bounds calculations are performed inside the function. The pointer to which the incoming array rvalue has decayed is simply incremented the required number of times -- this works because int is known, not because the 4 is known. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 24 '11 at 9:14
    
@Tomalak but *(array + i) wouldn't give the intended result if the compiler did not know about the 4 (ie it has to also be able to convert it into (int *)array + i*4 otherwise the addressing would be wrong) –  Spudd86 Jun 30 '11 at 15:03
    
@Spudd86: Hang on, are you talking about sizeof(int) 4 (which comes from the type int and is thus not relevant), or the original array dimension 4 (which does not exist inside the function)? I don't really understand what you're saying. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 30 '11 at 15:06
    
@Tomalak I'm talking about the fact that if you write int (*array)[4] then sizeof(*array) == sizeof(int) * 4 (ie: array is a pointer to an array of length 4, not a pointer to a pointer). The array dimension DOES exist inside the function because the declaration of the parameter specifies it. –  Spudd86 Jun 30 '11 at 15:12

Arrays in C/C++ are not passed by value. i.e. there is NO copying involved when you pass an array as a parameter. i.e. array is just a name that references the passed array.

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No, it references a pointer to which an rvalue to the array decayed. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 24 '11 at 9:15

Arrays in C/C++ are really just pointers (with the math done for you). Unless you explicitly make a copy of the contents of the array, passing an array is only passing a pointer to the first element.

So when you modify the array based on that base pointer, you're modifying the original array contents.

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3  
Arrays in C and C++ are not pointers. They decay into pointers in some contexts, but they are not the same. –  jamesdlin Jun 15 '10 at 1:00
    
Arrays are absolutely not pointers, any more than an int is. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 24 '11 at 9:15

Heading ##Hi The following is an example of creating a Two dimensional array and updating and then printing using **

#include&lt;stdio.h&gt;
#include&lt;stdlib.h&gt;

void showArray(double** theArray,int arraySizeX, int arraySizeY){
    int index,index2;

    for(index=0;index&lt;arraySizeX;index++){
        for(index2=0;index2&lt;arraySizeY;index2++){
            printf("The valyee of arr[%d][%d] is %lf  \n",index,index2,theArray[index][index2]);
        }
    }


}

void setArray(double** theArray,int arraySizeX, int arraySizeY){
    int index,index2;

    for(index=0;index&lt;arraySizeX;index++){
        for(index2=0;index2&lt;arraySizeY;index2++){
            theArray[index][index2]=index+index2;
        }
    }


}


void main()
{

    int i, arraySizeX =3,arraySizeY=4;


    double** theArray;
    theArray = (double**) malloc(arraySizeX*sizeof(double*));

    for ( i = 0; i &lt; arraySizeX; i++)  {
        theArray[i] = (double*) malloc(arraySizeY*sizeof(double));
    }


    printf("*****************************\n");
    showArray(theArray, arraySizeX,  arraySizeY);
    printf("*****************************\n");

    setArray(theArray, arraySizeX,  arraySizeY);

    printf("__________________________________\n");
    showArray(theArray, arraySizeX,  arraySizeY);
    printf("__________________________________\n");

    free(theArray);


}

I hope this helps,

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