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I was wondering if it was possible for jQuery to find a file extension based on a returned string?

A filename (string) will be passed to a function (openFile) and I wanted that function to do different things based on what file has been passed through, it could be image files or pdf files.

function openFile(file) { 

  //if .jpg/.gif/.png do something

  //if .zip/.rar do something else

  //if .pdf do something else

};

I've been looking for something that will find the file's extension but I can't seem to find anything.

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2  
thanks everyone for your help! :) – SoulieBaby Jun 15 '10 at 3:47
up vote 59 down vote accepted

How about something like this.

Test the live example: http://jsfiddle.net/6hBZU/1/

It assumes that the string will always end with the extension:

function openFile(file) {
    var extension = file.substr( (file.lastIndexOf('.') +1) );
    switch(extension) {
        case 'jpg':
        case 'png':
        case 'gif':
            alert('was jpg png gif');  // There's was a typo in the example where
        break;                         // the alert ended with pdf instead of gif.
        case 'zip':
        case 'rar':
            alert('was zip rar');
        break;
        case 'pdf':
            alert('was pdf');
        break;
        default:
            alert('who knows');
    }
};

openFile("somestring.png");

EDIT: I mistakenly deleted part of the string in openFile("somestring.png");. Corrected. Had it in the Live Example, though.

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3  
Haha, I almost left a comment, then I thought Hmm... maybe I am not understanding something. +1 great answer – Doug Neiner Jun 15 '10 at 3:41
    
this way won't work when the file does not have a extension. like folder/file-without-extension – Amir Surnay Nov 16 '13 at 9:38
    
so is this faster than .split('.').pop(); which is posted below? – cantsay Sep 7 '14 at 2:53

To get the file extension, I would do this:

var ext = file.split('.').pop();
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4  
+1 - Much nicer way of getting the extension. Wish I'd thought of it! – user113716 Jun 15 '10 at 3:42
    
very upscale, indeed. – Code Monkey Mar 26 '13 at 14:59
    
small clear code :) upvoted – agungyuliaji May 17 at 7:49

Yet another way to write it up:

function getExtension(filename) {
    return filename.split('.').pop().toLowerCase();
}

function openFile(file) { 
    switch(getExtension(file)) {
        //if .jpg/.gif/.png do something
        case 'jpg': case 'gif': case 'png':
            /* handle */
            break;
        //if .zip/.rar do something else
        case 'zip': case 'rar':
            /* handle */
            break;

        //if .pdf do something else
        case 'pdf':
            /* handle */
            break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for adding .toLowerCase(). Could be important. – user113716 Jun 15 '10 at 3:48

You can use a combination of substring and lastIndexOf

Sample

var fileName = "test.jpg";
var fileExtension = fileName.substring(fileName.lastIndexOf('.') + 1); 
share|improve this answer

Since the extension will always be the string after a period in a complete/partial file name, just use the built in split function in js, and test the resultant extension for what you want it to do. If split returns only one piece / no pieces, it does not contain an extension.

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Try this:

var extension = fileString.substring(fileString.lastIndexOf('.') + 1);
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var fileName = 'file.txt';

// Getting Extension

var ext = fileName.split('.')[1];

// OR

var ext = fileName.split('.').pop();
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