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From wiki: In computing, just-in-time compilation (JIT), also known as dynamic translation, is a technique for improving the runtime performance of a computer program.

So I guess JVM has another compiler, not javac, that only compiles bytecode to machine code at runtime, while javac compiles sources to bytecode,is that right?

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5 Answers

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That is precisely correct.

  • javac compiles .java source code to .class bytecode for JVM (Java Virtual Machine)
  • HotSpot, at run-time, identifies which portion of the bytecode is worth further compiling to the running platform instructions for performance

See also


Even more compilers can get involved!

Note that other languages other than Java can also join in on the fun, by having their own compilers that compile to JVM bytecode, and then use whatever JVM runtime to run on. On HotSpot, this too mean that they'll get JIT-compiled.

See also

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Yes, JIT works in runtime.

Javac translates java source to java bytecode. While JVM interprets that bytecode or compiles it to native code. But this isn't a step like translating the source, as the JIT compiler hasn't any user frontend. Also, the JIT runs only for hot methods - the most called ones.

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Note that a JIT doesn't necessarily mean that hotspots are detected. You can also build a JIT that compiles all code before it is run. The HotSpot JVM (used in the Sun JDK/OpenJDK) however does detect hotspots. –  Joachim Sauer Jun 15 '10 at 8:31
    
How can a compiler that compiles all code before it is run be considered a Just In Time compiler? –  DJClayworth Jun 15 '10 at 14:18
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That's precisely right.

Suns JVM (and most other ones too I suppose), doesn't compile entire class-files into machine-code right away, but runs the application for a period of time in order to detect hotspots in the code, which would benefit from being compiled (instead of interpreted), and compiles those "just in time".

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This two step compilation process to get to native machine code actually also happens with most statically compiled languages such as C and C++. First they will compile the code into a temporary format such as 2-3 code, then a second compiler will translate this into native machine code. The purpose of this separation into frontend and backend compiler is to make it much easier to port the compiler to a different machine architecture or to accept a different input language. GCC is a good example of a static compiler that is very versatile due to this architecture.

The benefit from doing the final translation at runtime, other than not having to select the target machine architecture until you run the application, is that you have additional information available about how the program is actually being run. This can be used very effectively to improve the final compilation.

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Compile time - javac compiles java code into bytecode (.class files).

Run-time - the JVM interprets bytecode into machine code. JIT is an optimization that allows faster execution of bytecode, by detecting hotspots (for example, in the Sun JVM) and compiling the code beforehand.

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Note that a JIT doesn't necessarily mean that hotspots are detected. You can also build a JIT that compiles all code before it is run. The HotSpot JVM (used in the Sun JDK/OpenJDK) however does detect hotspots. –  Joachim Sauer Jun 15 '10 at 8:30
    
@Joachim - that is correct, clarified my answer. –  Yuval Adam Jun 15 '10 at 8:38
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