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How do I retrieve the second highest value from a table?

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1  
can you please post your table structure and what you have tried yet? –  oezi Jun 15 '10 at 8:33
3  
And the SQL dialect you're using. So far there are two answers seemingly dealing with MySQL, but I guess both wouldn't work with any other DBMS. –  Joey Jun 15 '10 at 8:34
1  
The question becomes more interesting if you have multiple groups in the table, say, a column LAST_NAME, and for each LAST_NAME you want to retrieve the person with the second highest AGE. Is that the case, or do you just want the second highest of the whole table? –  littlegreen Jun 15 '10 at 8:52

10 Answers 10

select max(val) from table where val < (select max(val) form table) 
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select top 2 field_name from table_name order by field_name desc limit 1

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1  
When you use limit you can't use TOP Top is for SQL Server –  Madhivanan Jun 15 '10 at 9:27

In MySQL you could for instance use LIMIT 1, 1:

SELECT col FROM tbl ORDER BY col DESC LIMIT 1, 1

See the MySQL reference manual: SELECT Syntax).

The LIMIT clause can be used to constrain the number of rows returned by the SELECT statement. LIMIT takes one or two numeric arguments, which must both be nonnegative integer constants (except when using prepared statements).

With two arguments, the first argument specifies the offset of the first row to return, and the second specifies the maximum number of rows to return. The offset of the initial row is 0 (not 1):

SELECT * FROM tbl LIMIT 5,10;  # Retrieve rows 6-15
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whilst ordering by the number you wish to get the second-highest of. –  icio Jun 15 '10 at 8:34
    
Thanks. Updated –  aioobe Jun 15 '10 at 8:35
SELECT E.lastname, E.salary FROM employees E
WHERE 2 = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM employess E2
            WHERE E2.salary > E.salary)

Taken from here
This works in almost all Dbs

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I believe the > must be >=. Plus, this won't work if any of the higher ranked values have multiple entries (say if there are 2 employees with the same highest salary, and you're trying to get the employees with the 2nd highest salary) –  potatopeelings Jun 15 '10 at 9:31
    
doesn't that get the third? If it has 2 larger values... but otherwise looks peachy. –  ANeves Jun 15 '10 at 9:32
Select Top 1 sq.ColumnToSelect
From
(Select Top 2 ColumnToSelect
From MyTable
Order by ColumnToSelect Desc
)sq
Order by sq.ColumnToSelect asc
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Try this

SELECT * FROM 
(SELECT empno, deptno, sal,
DENSE_RANK() OVER (PARTITION BY deptno ORDER BY sal DESC NULLS LAST) DENSE_RANK
FROM emp)
WHERE DENSE_RANK = 2;

This works in both Oracle and SQL Server.

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Your code generates a syntax error on SQL Server. No doubt could be ported, though. –  onedaywhen Jun 15 '10 at 9:36

Try this

SELECT TOP 1 Column FROM Table WHERE Column < (SELECT MAX(Column) FROM Table) 
ORDER BY Column DESC

SELECT TOP 1 Column FROM (SELECT TOP <n> Column FROM Table ORDER BY Column DESC) 

ORDER BY ASC

change the n to get the value of any position

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Cool, this is almost like Code Golf.

Microsoft SQL Server 2005 and higher:

SELECT *
FROM (
    SELECT 
        *,
        row_number() OVER (ORDER BY var DESC) AS ranking
    FROM table
) AS q
WHERE ranking = 2
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You'd need to use DENSE_RANK to account for ties. –  Martin Smith Aug 11 '10 at 8:37

Maybe:

SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY value DESC LIMIT 1, 1
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Maybe..? Btw, if you indent your code by four spaces you will get a prettier output. –  Patrick Jun 15 '10 at 9:02

one solution would be like this:

SELECT var FROM table ORDER BY var DESC LIMIT 1,1
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