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In Antlr, if I have a rule for example:

someRule : TOKENA TOKENB;

it would accept : "tokena tokenb"

if I would like TOKENA to be optional, I can say,

someRule : TOKENA* TOKENB;

then I can have : "tokena tokenb" or "tokenb" or "tokena tokena tokenb"

but this also means it can be repeated more that once. Is there anyway I can say this token can be there 1 or less times but not more than one? so it would accept:

"tokena tokenb" or "tokenb" BUT NOT "tokena tokena tokenb"?

Many thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

... Is there anyway I can say this token can be there 1 or less times but not more than one? ...

Here's how:

someRule 
  :  TOKENA? TOKENB
  ;

or:

someRule 
  :  TOKENA TOKENB
  |  TOKENB
  ;
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I understand the second option, I didn't think of being able to do that, my fail. The documentation says the the '?' is a 'semantic predicate' can you explain what a semantic predicate is? –  Simon Kenyon Shepard Jun 16 '10 at 14:13
    
@Simon, no, ? by itself means "match the preceding once or none at all". –  Bart Kiers Jun 16 '10 at 14:24
    
@Simon, I was just leaving, but do you want me to post a follow up on what a semantic predicate is? If so, just leave a comment here and I'll post a reply later this evening. –  Bart Kiers Jun 16 '10 at 14:26
    
K, that would be great I was using antlr.org/wiki/display/ANTLR3/ANTLR+Cheat+Sheet but it doesn't really explain what a semantic predicate is, and neither did googling it, so I assumed it was something else... –  Simon Kenyon Shepard Jun 16 '10 at 15:26
    
@Simon, I posted a separate question (and answer) about semantic predicates here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3056441/… –  Bart Kiers Jun 16 '10 at 19:29

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