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Is it, in any way, possible to disable the browsers execution of script inside a block/section/element ?

My scenario is, that I'm letting my (future) users create "rich content" (using CK-editor). Content that wil later be shown to other users - with all the dangers that imply: xss, redirection, identity theft, spam and what not...

I've, more or less, given up on trying to "sanitize" the incomming XHTML, after seeing how many known "vectors of attack" there are: http://ha.ckers.org/xss.html

What I'm really looking for is something like:

< div id="userContent">< scriptOFF>

suspect HTML

< /scriptOFF>< /div>

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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The ideal way is to not accept html/javascript from the end users. If you are okay with that limitation, you just need to make sure you encode the output according to the appropriate context. Don't re-invent the wheel, just use an existing library for that purpose.

But if you must accept HTML, use a library like OWASP's ANTI-SAMY or HTML Purifier. They were built exactly for this purpose.

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HTML-purifier it is - and works perfectly (as far as I can see) :) - also it's recommended by OWASP. –  T4NK3R Jun 22 '10 at 20:36
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You have to sanitize the input, there is no way to selectively disable javascript that I know of.

It is important to use a whitelist of allowed tags, not a blacklist. That way it should be possible to do it safely.

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Even if you used a "noscript" tag or a "textarea" tag its sill xss. Whats keeping the attacker from injecting closing tags?

< div id="userContent">< scriptOFF>

<?=$_GET['xss']?>

< /scriptOFF>< /div>

But its still xss:

http://localhost/xss.php?xss=< /scriptOFF>< /div> <script> alert(/still_xss/) </script>
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Yes, but that would "whitelist" would be HUGE - and I'm far from competent enough to detect subtle loopholes, alá those described here: http://ha.ckers.org/xss.html

This would need to be a "community effort" - looking at HTML-purifier (http://htmlpurifier.org) now...

I just thought it would be great to have such a tag to prevent 99% of the XSS "vectors"

  • Can "anyone in power" please convince the browser-makers to implement it : )

Edit: Alright. HTML-purifier it is! - thanks to everybody for replying : )

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Browser implementers are thinking about it - search for "html5 iframe sandbox". It will take years for it to become widespread, and by then attackers would move over to other browser vulnerabilities. –  Sripathi Krishnan Jun 15 '10 at 11:58
    
Security should (almost) never be enforced on the client! What would happen if someone visits your site with an older browser that does not yet support this? –  Mad Scientist Jun 15 '10 at 12:00
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@sri mentioned where to find "html5 iframe sandbox" information, here is a test script.

What you should see is "Browser supports iframe sandbox attribute :)" is you are viewing in Chromium.

Might also get positive results in khtml/webkit based browsers like phone browsers. Opera 11, Firefox 3.6 and Firefox4 have yet to implement the sandbox attribute.

Article explaining background and current state at gnubyexample.blogspot.com

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No, but then again you should definitely not be allowing your users to hand-feed code into the page in the first place.

Don't attempt to sanitize Javascript; do not allow Javascript. In fact, do not allow HTML at all. Write your own limited markup language (ala BBCode) or allow a select few HTML tags if you really have to.

i.e. Be additive rather than subtractive with your security endeavours.

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