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I would like to have a subroutine as a member of a hash which is able to have access to other hash members.

For example

sub setup {
  %a = (
   txt => "hello world",
   print_hello => sub {
    print ${txt};
  })
return %a
}

my %obj = setup();
$obj{print_hello};

Ideally this would output "hello world"

EDIT

Sorry, I failed to specify one requirement

I should be able to do

$obj{txt} = "goodbye";

and then $obj{print_hello} should output goodbye

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you want the calling code to be able to modify the message in the hash, you need to return the hash by reference. This does what you asked for:

use strict;
use warnings;

sub self_expressing_hash {
    my %h;
    %h = (
        msg              => "hello",
        express_yourself => sub { print $h{msg}, "\n" },
    );
    return \%h;
}

my $h = self_expressing_hash();
$h->{express_yourself}->();

$h->{msg} = 'goodbye';
$h->{express_yourself}->();

However, it's a bizarre concoction -- essentially, a data structure that contains some built-in behavior. Sounds a like an object to me. Perhaps you should look into an O-O approach for your project.

share|improve this answer
1  
Wouldn't pre-declaring $h, and assigning the hashref to it be simpler? Something like my $h; $h = { msg => 'hello', express_yourself => sub { print $h->{msg}, "\n" } }; – MkV Jun 15 '10 at 14:15
    
And yes, this is very much like Class::Closure, all it needs is an AUTOLOAD which checks $self{$AUTOLOAD} is a sub ref and adds it to the package symbol table (presuming that setup() is the constructor of a class). – MkV Jun 15 '10 at 14:16
    
+1 for mention of object. It's definitely the work of an object. – fengshaun Jun 15 '10 at 23:13

This will work:

sub setup { 
    my %a = ( txt => "hello world" );
    $a{print_hello} = sub { print $a{txt} };
    return %a;
}

my %obj = setup();
$obj{print_hello}->();
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the response, please see edit – Mike Jun 15 '10 at 13:30

Close:

sub setup {
  my %a = (
   txt => "hello world",
   print_hello => sub {
    print $a{txt};
  });
  return %a;
}

my %obj = setup();
$obj{print_hello}->();
share|improve this answer
1  
This works as written but makes %a a global variable. – mob Jun 15 '10 at 14:57

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