Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a situation where i have a class

class Foo
{
    Foo Bar()
    {
        return new Foo();
    }
}

Now i wan tot create an interface for it

class IFoo
{
    ??? Bar();
}

What should be in place of the question marks? Each class should return it's own type, not Foo.

The solutions below work but do not looks clean. I don't understand why i have to specify the same class twice, and there is nothing like "this" for the current type

This is how i am using it later

class GenericClass<T> where T : IFoo
{ 
    T foo = new T();
    T item = foo.Bar();
}
share|improve this question
1  
The problem with a generic interface is that you now need to specify T wherever you use this interface in code - so you've coupled your interface to the underlying type. Interfaces tend to try and do the opposite? –  Adam Houldsworth Jun 15 '10 at 13:58
    
@Andrey - Like Adam has said, this is a serious code smell. My answer will do what you're after, but it's not good practise. –  GenericTypeTea Jun 15 '10 at 14:04
    
@GenericTypeTea, sorry I should have clarified that it would work :) –  Adam Houldsworth Jun 15 '10 at 14:11
    
@Adam - ref the solutions below not looking clean, what exactly are you trying to achieve. Perhaps you're fixing the wrong problem. –  GenericTypeTea Jun 15 '10 at 14:16
    
@GenericTypeTea, think you mean @Andrey? –  Adam Houldsworth Jun 15 '10 at 14:19

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You ask:

The solutions below work but do not looks clean. I don't understand why i have to specify the same class twice, and there is nothing like "this" for the current type

The reason why you have to specify it twice is because C# lacks the feature that you need. What you want is something like this:

interface IFoo
{
    IFoo Bar();
}

class Foo : IFoo
{
    Foo Bar() // should work since Foo is an IFoo, but it's not supported by C#
    {
        return new Foo();
    }
}

From a type-safety point of view, this should work (it's called return type covariance). In fact, other programming languages such as D or Java support this, see this example on Wikipedia. Unfortunately, return type covariance is not supported by C# (not even C# 4.0, which introduced covariance for generics), which is why you have to use the "generics workaround" illustrated in the other answers.

Covariant return types are a highly requested feature in C#, see MS Connect Bug 90909.

share|improve this answer
    
Your code won't compile because the class Foo does not implement IFoo Bar(). You can modify Foo this to make Bar return an IFoo, but it'll mean you need to upcast the IFoo to Foo anywhere you might want to access Foo's methods. (although safe to do, not very tidy to write). <br/> Covariance and contravariance are supported in generic types as of C# 4.0, but they're not really necessary for this scenario. The solution GenerticTypeTea posted is sufficient. –  Mark H Jun 15 '10 at 14:13
    
@Mark H - I think what Heinzi is saying is saying is "this is what the OP wants... however it's not possible". –  GenericTypeTea Jun 15 '10 at 14:15
    
@GenericTypeTea: Exactly. :-) Actually, I'm saying "It's not possible in C# (but in other languages)." –  Heinzi Jun 15 '10 at 14:30
    
@MarkH: Covariance (in the sense that Java has it -- not just generic covariance like C# 4.0 but also return type covariance) would allow my code example to work, eliminating the need for using generics in this case. –  Heinzi Jun 15 '10 at 14:31

You could add a generic type and constrain it using the interface type:

public interface IFoo<T>
{
    T Bar();
}

You'd implement this as follows:

public class Foo : IFoo<Foo>
{
    public Foo Bar()
    {
        return new Foo();
    }
}

public class Cheese : IFoo<Cheese>
{
    public Cheese Bar()
    {
        return new Cheese();
    }
}

Update, if you never care about the concrete return type of Foo, then you can do the following:

public interface IFoo
{
    IFoo Bar();
}

Which is implemented like:

public class Foo : IFoo
{
    public IFoo Bar()
    {
        return new Foo();
    }
}

Then in your generic class:

public class GenericClass<T> where T : class, IFoo, new()
{
    public T Rar()
    {
        T foo = new T();
        T item = foo.Bar() as T;
        return item;
    }
}

GenericClass<Foo>.Rar(); will be a concrete implementation of Foo.

share|improve this answer
    
This will not compile. –  SLaks Jun 15 '10 at 13:42
    
@SLaks: He just needs to add public, right? –  Dan Tao Jun 15 '10 at 13:44
    
Looks fine to me. Why shouldn't it compile? –  jalf Jun 15 '10 at 13:44
    
@GenericTypeTea, @jalf: For Foo to implement IFoo<Foo> its implementation methods (in this case: Bar) need to be public. That's all, as far as I can tell. –  Dan Tao Jun 15 '10 at 13:45
1  
Actually, I think Slaks may have written that comment while I was editing the answer. I originally wrote it with a constraint saying where T : IFoo. –  GenericTypeTea Jun 15 '10 at 13:46

I think that the real question is: why you need the derived type in the interface? Interface is exactly for that reason - abstracting from the concrete classes. If it's just for convenience, so you don't have to cast to Foo after calling Bar(), you can implement the interface explicitly:

interface IFoo
{
    IFoo Bar();
}

class Foo : IFoo
{
    public Foo Bar()
    {
        return new Foo();
    }

    IFoo IFoo.Bar()
    {
        return Bar();
    }
}

Ask yourself the question: why do you introduce an interface when you want the concrete type?

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is exactly what I was thinking. –  juharr Jun 15 '10 at 14:21
    
To give a simple example: This object is later used to bind a grid. At that point i do not use the interface that only covers the crud, but instead depend on properties that represent columns –  Andrey Jun 16 '10 at 12:54

You can use an abstract base class plus explicit member implementation to achieve this. First, declare your interface like this:

interface IFoo
{
    IFoo Bar();
}

Then, declare a generic abstract class that implements IFoo in an explicit manner, and also declares an abstract method that kind of "overloads" Bar(), but in a generic manner:

abstract class BaseFooImpl<T> : IFoo where T : BaseFooImpl
{
    public abstract T Bar();

    IFoo IFoo.Bar()
    {
        return Bar(); // this will call the abstract Bar()
    }
 }

Now, define your concrete classes like this:

class ConcreteFoo : BaseFooImpl<ConcreteFoo>
{
   public override ConcreteFoo Bar()
   {
      return this; // for example, of course.
   }
}

The advantage of this approach is that you can always use non-generic IFoo references to hold concrete instances. If you make your interface generic, you can't, for instance, declare these:

IFoo mammalInstance, fishInstance; // Instead of IFoo<Mammal> mammalInstance; IFoo<Fish> fishInstance;
List<IFoo> manyInstances; // Instead of List<IFoo<IFoo>>, which doesn't even work AFAIK
share|improve this answer
    
And what prevents someone from saying class C2 : BaseFooImpl<ConcreteFoo> ? Nothing. This does not constrain Bar to return C2. –  Eric Lippert Jun 15 '10 at 16:12
    
@Eric, that's unsettling. It even invalidates my answer, if we stick to the needs of the OP. I guess this problem is common to the others solutions posted here too. However, C2 (or better, its author) knows what it is doing. –  Humberto Jun 16 '10 at 1:35
    
@Eric IS there any way to constrain something to return its own type using an Interface? Even "ICloneable" only constrains the coder to return object. I could easily have Apple return an Orange –  DevinB Aug 3 '11 at 1:02
public interface IFoo<T>
{
    T Bar();
}

Your implementation would then be:

class Foo : IFoo<Foo>
{
    Foo Bar()
    {
        return new Foo();
    }
}

class Baz : IFoo<Baz>
{
    Baz Bar()
    { 
        return new Baz(); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You need to make the interface generic, like this:

interface IFoo<TClass> where TClass : IFoo<TClass>, class {
    TClass Bar();
}
share|improve this answer

Not sure what you are trying to accomplish but it could be done this way:

interface IFoo<T>
{
    T Bar();
}



   class Foo:IFoo<Foo>
    {

        #region IFoo<Foo> Members

        public Foo Bar()
        {
            return new Foo();
        }

        #endregion
    }

Or Like this:

    interface IFoo
    {
        IFoo Bar();
    }

class Foo : IFoo
    {

        #region IFoo Members

        public IFoo Bar()
        {
            return new Foo();
        }

        #endregion
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.