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I'm doing a program to handle many blocking I/O operations at a time by spawning an Agent/MailboxProcessor per operation. I've got a bunch of files I've cached in memory in a Map which I want to share among these agents. However, I've also got a FileSystemWatcher to callback whenever changes are made to the files, so that I can update the cache.

How do I make this happen without risking the cache being corrupted by multi-threaded read and write ?

It seems to me that the Map is already based on pointers to objects, so would that automatically solve my problem as I'm simply changing the pointers to the new objects as they are loaded, or is this a broken understanding of it?

Thanks

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

It seems to me that the Map is already based on pointers to objects, so would that automatically solve my problem as I'm simply changing the pointers to the new objects as they are loaded, or is this a broken understanding of it?

I think your understanding is correct. You can just have a single mutable reference to an immutable Map. Writing a new map to the reference is atomic so there is no need to synchronize that.

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Thank you, I'm glad to hear that. But, I'm a bit confused about this 'mutable reference to an immutable Map'. How would you declare that ? – CSkau Jun 15 '10 at 14:32
    
@CSkau: let x = ref (Map.empty<string>) – Juliet Jun 15 '10 at 14:58
    
Wonderful Juliet ! It seems I got it right then. :) – CSkau Jun 15 '10 at 15:12
    
@Jon: hmmmmm... I'm not sure about this approach. If one child thread calls x := (!x.add("Juliet") and another calls x := (!x.add("Jon")) at the same time, someone loses their changes. So you either you have a single thread dedicated to writing, or you protect writes from multiple threads with a lock. And even then, without marking a critical section with a lock or declaring your variable as volatile, some threads might have a cached pointer which prevents mutation from being visible immediately to all threads. Best to avoid mutable state altogether. – Juliet Jun 15 '10 at 16:38
    
But there is only one writer, the FileSystemWatcher, right? – Jon Harrop Jun 15 '10 at 18:54

When I've seen similar Erlang programs, the systems are set up like this:

  • You can wrap up the FileSystemWatcher with a MailboxProcessor, that way you're handling incoming updates as messages and not windows events. Your FileSystemWatcherProcess can hold a list of children who are listening, and push out updates as needed. This is basically the same thing event-based programming, only with messages and actors instead.

    Your FileSystemWatcherProcess should not need to maintain a your cache of files, it just blindly pushes out messages.

  • OR You have a master process which holds the state of the map. File SystemWatcher sends updates to the master. Each child thread holds a reference to the master, so that each time they finish processing an item or batch of items, they send a message to the master process requesting the latest Map.

Neither system requires any locking.

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Following up to Jon's answer. if you end up having multiple writers, then instead of locks you can always do CAS:

 let updateMap value =
    let mutable success = false
    while not success do
      let v = !x
      let result = Interlocked.CompareExchange(x, v.Add(value), v)
      success <- Object.ReferenceEqual(v, result)

And, if targeting only .Net 4.0 is an option for you, you shouldn't be inventing all that stuff yourself: there is a System.Collections.Concurrent.ConcurrentDictionary class which implements concurrently readable and writable dictionary already.

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In this case though I've luckily only got a single writer, plus I'm using 3.5. I was however not aware of there being a concurrent collections library. This will be greatly helpful in the future ! Thanks. – CSkau Jun 15 '10 at 22:03

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