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I'm trying to discover why two nearly identical class sets are behaving different from Hibernate 3's perspective. I'm fairly new to Hibernate in general and I'm hoping I'm missing something fairly obvious about the mappings or timing issues or something along those lines but I spent the whole day yesterday staring at the two sets and any differences that would lead to one being able to be persisted and the other not completely escaped me.

I appologize in advance for the length of this question but it all hinges around some pretty specific implementation details.

I have the following class mapped with Annotations and managed by Hibernate 3.? (if the specific specific version turns out to be pertinent, I'll figure out what it is). Java version is 1.6.

...

@Embeddable
public class JobStateChange implements Comparable<JobStateChange> {

    @Temporal(TemporalType.TIMESTAMP)
    @Column(nullable = false)
    private Date date;

    @Enumerated(EnumType.STRING)
    @Column(nullable = false, length = JobState.FIELD_LENGTH)
    private JobState state;

    @ManyToOne(fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    @JoinColumn(name = "acting_user_id", nullable = false)
    private User actingUser;

    public JobStateChange() {

    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(final JobStateChange o) {
        return this.date.compareTo(o.date);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(final Object obj) {
        if (this == obj) {
            return true;
        } else if (!(obj instanceof JobStateChange)) {
            return false;
        }

        JobStateChange candidate = (JobStateChange) obj;

        return this.state == candidate.state
            && this.actingUser.equals(candidate.getUser())
            && this.date.equals(candidate.getDate());
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return this.state.hashCode()
             + this.actingUser.hashCode()
             + this.date.hashCode();
    }

}

It is mapped as a Hibernate CollectionOfElements in the class Job as follows:

...

@Entity
@Table(
        name = "job",
        uniqueConstraints = {
                @UniqueConstraint(
                        columnNames = {
                                "agency", //Job Name
                                "payment_type", //Job Name
                                "payment_file", //Job Name
                                "date_of_payment",
                                "payment_control_number",
                                "truck_number"
                        })
        })
public class Job implements Serializable {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = -1131729422634638834L;

    ...

    @org.hibernate.annotations.CollectionOfElements
    @JoinTable(name = "job_state", joinColumns = @JoinColumn(name = "job_id"))
    @Sort(type = SortType.NATURAL)
    private final SortedSet<JobStateChange> stateChanges = new TreeSet<JobStateChange>();

    ...

    public void advanceState(
            final User actor,
            final Date date) {
        JobState nextState;
        LOGGER.debug("Current state of {} is {}.", this, this.getCurrentState());
        if (null == this.currentState) {
            nextState = JobState.BEGINNING;
        } else {
            if (!this.isAdvanceable()) {
                throw new IllegalAdvancementException(this.currentState.illegalAdvancementStateMessage);
            }
            if (this.currentState.isDivergent()) {
                nextState = this.currentState.getNextState(this);
            } else {
                nextState = this.currentState.getNextState();
            }
        }
        JobStateChange stateChange = new JobStateChange(nextState, actor, date);
        this.setCurrentState(stateChange.getState());
        this.stateChanges.add(stateChange);
        LOGGER.debug("Advanced {} to {}", this, this.getCurrentState());
    }

    private void setCurrentState(final JobState jobState) {
        this.currentState = jobState;
    }

    boolean isAdvanceable() {
        return this.getCurrentState().isAdvanceable(this);
    }

    ...

    @Override
    public boolean equals(final Object obj) {
        if (obj == this) {
            return true;
        } else if (!(obj instanceof Job)) {
            return false;
        }

        Job otherJob = (Job) obj;

        return this.getName().equals(otherJob.getName())
            && this.getDateOfPayment().equals(otherJob.getDateOfPayment())
            && this.getPaymentControlNumber().equals(otherJob.getPaymentControlNumber())
            && this.getTruckNumber().equals(otherJob.getTruckNumber());
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return this.getName().hashCode()
             + this.getDateOfPayment().hashCode()
             + this.getPaymentControlNumber().hashCode()
             + this.getTruckNumber().hashCode();
    }

    ...

}

The purpose of JobStateChange is to record when the Job moves through a series of State Changes that are outline in JobState as enums which know about advancement and decrement rules. The interface used to advance Jobs through a series of states is to call Job.advanceState() with a Date and a User. If the Job is advanceable according to rules coded in the enum, then a new StateChange is added to the SortedSet and everyone's happy. If not, an IllegalAdvancementException is thrown.

The DDL this generates is as follows:

...

    drop table job;

    drop table job_state;

...

    create table job (
        id bigint generated by default as identity,
        current_state varchar(25),
        date_of_payment date not null,
        beginningCheckNumber varchar(8) not null,
        item_count integer,
        agency varchar(10) not null,
        payment_file varchar(25) not null,
        payment_type varchar(25) not null,
        endingCheckNumber varchar(8) not null,
        payment_control_number varchar(4) not null,
        truck_number varchar(255) not null,
        wrapping_system_type varchar(15) not null,
        printer_id bigint,
        primary key (id),
        unique (agency, payment_type, payment_file, date_of_payment, payment_control_number, truck_number)
    );

    create table job_state (
        job_id bigint not null,
        acting_user_id bigint not null,
        date timestamp not null,
        state varchar(25) not null,
        primary key (job_id, acting_user_id, date, state)
    );

...

    alter table job 
        add constraint FK19BBD12FB9D70 
        foreign key (printer_id) 
        references printer;

    alter table job_state 
        add constraint FK57C2418FED1F0D21 
        foreign key (acting_user_id) 
        references app_user;

    alter table job_state 
        add constraint FK57C2418FABE090B3 
        foreign key (job_id) 
        references job;

...

The database is seeded with the following data prior to running tests

...

insert into job (id, agency, payment_type, payment_file, payment_control_number, date_of_payment, beginningCheckNumber, endingCheckNumber, item_count, current_state, printer_id, wrapping_system_type, truck_number)
values (-3, 'RRB', 'Monthly', 'Monthly','4501','1998-12-01 08:31:16' , '00000001','00040000', 40000, 'UNASSIGNED', null, 'KERN', '02');

insert into job_state (job_id, acting_user_id, date, state)
values (-3, -1, '1998-11-30 08:31:17', 'UNASSIGNED');

...

After the database schema is automatically generated and rebuilt by the Hibernate tool.

The following test runs fine up until the call to Session.flush()

...

@ContextConfiguration(locations = { "/applicationContext-data.xml", "/applicationContext-service.xml" })
public class JobDaoIntegrationTest
extends AbstractTransactionalJUnit4SpringContextTests {

    @Autowired
    private JobDao jobDao;

    @Autowired
    private SessionFactory sessionFactory;

    @Autowired
    private UserService userService;

    @Autowired
    private PrinterService printerService;

...

    @Test
    public void saveJob_JobAdvancedToAssigned_AllExpectedStateChanges() {
        //Get an unassigned Job
        Job job = this.jobDao.getJob(-3L);

        assertEquals(JobState.UNASSIGNED, job.getCurrentState());
        Date advancedToUnassigned = new GregorianCalendar(1998, 10, 30, 8, 31, 17).getTime();
        assertEquals(advancedToUnassigned, job.getStateChange(JobState.UNASSIGNED).getDate());

        //Satisfy advancement constraints and advance
        job.setPrinter(this.printerService.getPrinter(-1L));

        Date advancedToAssigned = new Date();
        job.advanceState(
                this.userService.getUserByUsername("admin"),
                advancedToAssigned);

        assertEquals(JobState.ASSIGNED, job.getCurrentState());

        assertEquals(advancedToUnassigned, job.getStateChange(JobState.UNASSIGNED).getDate());
        assertEquals(advancedToAssigned, job.getStateChange(JobState.ASSIGNED).getDate());

        //Persist to DB
        this.sessionFactory.getCurrentSession().flush();

...
    }

...

}

The error thrown is SQLCODE=-803, SQLSTATE=23505:

could not insert collection rows: [jaci.model.job.Job.stateChanges#-3]

org.hibernate.exception.ConstraintViolationException: could not insert collection rows: [jaci.model.job.Job.stateChanges#-3]
at org.hibernate.exception.SQLStateConverter.convert(SQLStateConverter.java:94)
at org.hibernate.exception.JDBCExceptionHelper.convert(JDBCExceptionHelper.java:66)
at org.hibernate.persister.collection.AbstractCollectionPersister.insertRows(AbstractCollectionPersister.java:1416)
at org.hibernate.action.CollectionUpdateAction.execute(CollectionUpdateAction.java:86)
at org.hibernate.engine.ActionQueue.execute(ActionQueue.java:279)
at org.hibernate.engine.ActionQueue.executeActions(ActionQueue.java:263)
at org.hibernate.engine.ActionQueue.executeActions(ActionQueue.java:170)
at org.hibernate.event.def.AbstractFlushingEventListener.performExecutions(AbstractFlushingEventListener.java:321)
at org.hibernate.event.def.DefaultFlushEventListener.onFlush(DefaultFlushEventListener.java:50)
at org.hibernate.impl.SessionImpl.flush(SessionImpl.java:1027)
at jaci.dao.JobDaoIntegrationTest.saveJob_JobAdvancedToAssigned_AllExpectedStateChanges(JobDaoIntegrationTest.java:98)
at org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringTestMethod.invoke(SpringTestMethod.java:160)
at org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringMethodRoadie.runTestMethod(SpringMethodRoadie.java:233)
at org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringMethodRoadie$RunBeforesThenTestThenAfters.run(SpringMethodRoadie.java:333)
at org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringMethodRoadie.runWithRepetitions(SpringMethodRoadie.java:217)
at org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringMethodRoadie.runTest(SpringMethodRoadie.java:197)
at org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringMethodRoadie.run(SpringMethodRoadie.java:143)
at org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.invokeTestMethod(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.java:160)
at org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.run(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.java:97)
Caused by: com.ibm.db2.jcc.b.lm: DB2 SQL Error: SQLCODE=-803, SQLSTATE=23505, SQLERRMC=1;ACI_APP.JOB_STATE, DRIVER=3.50.152
at com.ibm.db2.jcc.b.wc.a(wc.java:575)
at com.ibm.db2.jcc.b.wc.a(wc.java:57)
at com.ibm.db2.jcc.b.wc.a(wc.java:126)
at com.ibm.db2.jcc.b.tk.b(tk.java:1593)
at com.ibm.db2.jcc.b.tk.c(tk.java:1576)
at com.ibm.db2.jcc.t4.db.k(db.java:353)
at com.ibm.db2.jcc.t4.db.a(db.java:59)
at com.ibm.db2.jcc.t4.t.a(t.java:50)
at com.ibm.db2.jcc.t4.tb.b(tb.java:200)
at com.ibm.db2.jcc.b.uk.Gb(uk.java:2355)
at com.ibm.db2.jcc.b.uk.e(uk.java:3129)
at com.ibm.db2.jcc.b.uk.zb(uk.java:568)
at com.ibm.db2.jcc.b.uk.executeUpdate(uk.java:551)
at org.hibernate.jdbc.NonBatchingBatcher.addToBatch(NonBatchingBatcher.java:46)
at org.hibernate.persister.collection.AbstractCollectionPersister.insertRows(AbstractCollectionPersister.java:1389)

Therein lies my problem… A nearly identical Class set (in fact, so identical that I've been chomping at the bit to make it a single class that serves both business entities) runs absolutely fine. It is identical except for name. Instead of Job it's Web. Instead of JobStateChange it's WebStateChange. Instead of JobState it's WebState. Both Job and Web's SortedSet of StateChanges are mapped as a Hibernate CollectionOfElements. Both are @Embeddable. Both are SortType.Natural. Both are backed by an Enumeration with some advancement rules in it. And yet when a nearly identical test is run for Web, no issue is discovered and the data flushes fine. For the sake of brevity I won't include all of the Web classes here, but I will include the test and if anyone wants to see the actual sources, I'll include them (just leave a comment).

The data seed:

insert into web (id, stock_type, pallet, pallet_id, date_received, first_icn, last_icn, shipment_id, current_state)
values (-1, 'PF', '0011', 'A', '2008-12-31 08:30:02', '000000001', '000080000', -1, 'UNSTAGED');

insert into web_state (web_id, date, state, acting_user_id)
values (-1, '2008-12-31 08:30:03', 'UNSTAGED', -1);

The test:

...

@ContextConfiguration(locations = { "/applicationContext-data.xml", "/applicationContext-service.xml" })
public class WebDaoIntegrationTest
extends AbstractTransactionalJUnit4SpringContextTests {

    @Autowired
    private WebDao webDao;

    @Autowired
    private UserService userService;

    @Autowired
    private SessionFactory sessionFactory;

...

    @Test
    public void saveWeb_WebAdvancedToNewState_AllExpectedStateChanges() {
        Web web = this.webDao.getWeb(-1L);
        Date advancedToUnstaged = new GregorianCalendar(2008, 11, 31, 8, 30, 3).getTime();

        assertEquals(WebState.UNSTAGED, web.getCurrentState());
        assertEquals(advancedToUnstaged, web.getState(WebState.UNSTAGED).getDate());

        Date advancedToStaged = new Date();
        web.advanceState(
                this.userService.getUserByUsername("admin"),
                advancedToStaged);

        this.sessionFactory.getCurrentSession().flush();

        web = this.webDao.getWeb(web.getId());

        assertEquals(
                "Web should have moved to STAGED State.",
                WebState.STAGED,
                web.getCurrentState());
        assertEquals(advancedToUnstaged, web.getState(WebState.UNSTAGED).getDate());
        assertEquals(advancedToStaged, web.getState(WebState.STAGED).getDate());

        assertNotNull(web.getState(WebState.UNSTAGED));
        assertNotNull(web.getState(WebState.STAGED));
    }

...

}

As you can see, I assert that the Web was reconstituted the way I expect, I advance it, flush it to the DB, and then re-get it and verify that the states are as I expect. Everything works perfectly. Not so with Job.

A possibly pertinent detail: the reconstitution code works fine if I cease to map JobStateChange.data as a TIMESTAMP and instead as a DATE, and ensure that all of the StateChanges always occur on different Dates. The problem is that this particular business entity can go through many state changes in a single day and so it needs to be sorted by time stamp rather than by date. If I don't do this then I can't sort the StateChanges correctly. That being said, WebStateChange.date is also mapped as a TIMESTAMP and so I again remain absolutely befuddled as to where this error is arising from.

I tried to do a fairly thorough job of giving all of the technical details of the implementation but as this particular question is very implementation specific, if I missed anything just let me know in the comments and I'll include it.

Thanks so much for your help!

UPDATE: Since it turns out to be important to the solution of my problem, I have to include the pertinent bits of the WebStateChange class as well.

...

@Embeddable
public class WebStateChange implements Comparable<WebStateChange> {

    @Temporal(TemporalType.TIMESTAMP)
    @Column(nullable = false)
    private Date date;

    @Enumerated(EnumType.STRING)
    @Column(nullable = false, length = WebState.FIELD_LENGTH)
    private WebState state;

    @ManyToOne(fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    @JoinColumn(name = "acting_user_id", nullable = false)
    private User actingUser;

...

    WebStateChange(
            final WebState state,
            final User actingUser,
            final Date date) {
        ExceptionUtils.illegalNullArgs(state, actingUser, date);
        this.state = state;
        this.actingUser = actingUser;
        this.date = new Date(date.getTime());
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(final WebStateChange otherStateChange) {
        return this.date.compareTo(otherStateChange.date);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(final Object candidate) {
        if (this == candidate) {
            return true;
        } else if (!(candidate instanceof WebStateChange)) {
            return false;
        }

        WebStateChange candidateWebState = (WebStateChange) candidate;

        return this.getState() == candidateWebState.getState()
            && this.getUser().equals(candidateWebState.getUser())
            && this.getDate().equals(candidateWebState.getDate());
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return this.getState().hashCode()
             + this.getUser().hashCode()
             + this.getDate().hashCode();
    }

...

}
share|improve this question
    
In case anyone needs it, the message for SQLCode -803 and SQLState 23505 is: "One or more values in the INSERT statement, UPDATE statement, or foreign key update caused by a DELETE statement are not valid because the primary key, unique constraint or unique index identified by index-id constrains table table-name from having duplicate rows for those columns." In this case, index-id is "1" and table-name is "ACI_APP.JOB_STATE". –  Jim Hurne Jun 15 '10 at 16:08
    
@Jim: Thanks for that –  Tim Visher Jun 15 '10 at 16:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The equals method in JobStateChange uses direct field access. Changing it to use getters for the various properties will fix the problem. You may also want to consider using the HibernateProxyHelper.getClassWithoutInitializingProxy method when performing the instanceof comparison.

For example, the JobStateChange.equals method might look like:

@Override
public boolean equals(final Object obj) {
    if (this == obj) {
        return true;
    } else if (!(HibernateProxyHelper.getClassWithoutInitializingProxy(obj) 
                 instanceof JobStateChange)) {
        return false;
    }

    JobStateChange candidate = (JobStateChange) obj;

    return this.getState() == candidate.getState()
        && this.getActingUser().equals(candidate.getUser())
        && this.getDate().equals(candidate.getDate());
}

Likewise, the JobStateChange.hashCode() method should also use getters (I would also recommend writing the hashCode method to match the algorithm suggested by Joshua Bloch in Effective Java, Chapter 3 (starting on page 38), but that isn't really relevant to the question):

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    return this.getState().hashCode()
         + this.getActingUser().hashCode()
         + this.getDate().hashCode();
}

Part of the "magic" behind Hibernate are dynamic proxies. In many cases, Hibernate creates (at run time) a subclass of your entity classes, and overrides the getter and setter methods of the persisted properties. Thus, you cannot reference the properties directly in equals and hashCode, but instead should access them using the property getters and setters, even internally in the entity class.

You were receiving a "unique constraint" error because Hibernate relies on the equals method when persisting changes to a collection.

With the old equals method, the proxied JobStateChange objects will never be equal to one another, or to non-proxied JobStateChange objects. Thus, Hibernate thought that the existing elements in the stateChanges collection were new items, and attempted to insert them into the database. Since the rows in job_state must be unique (defined by the primary key across all columns), a constraint volition was generated.

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic. Thanks so much for your phenomenal answer. –  Tim Visher Jun 16 '10 at 16:25
    
You're welcome. –  Jim Hurne Jun 17 '10 at 0:10
    
While your answer makes a lot of sense, I don't know if you could shed any light on one of the more confusing parts of the problem to me, specifically, why everything works if I annotate the JobStateChange.Date field as @Temporal(TemporalType.DATE). It's incorrect from the semantic perspective of the application, but it does work from the technical perspective of Hibernate, and I have no idea why. Thanks if you have time to explain further! –  Tim Visher Jun 17 '10 at 12:28

Well, duh, sir. You can obviously see that your equals method in JobStateChange uses direct field access while your WebStateChange class uses accessors. If you change JobStateChange.equals to use accessors, it'll work perfectly.

I can't believe you couldn't see that!


Seriously… Seriously!?

OK. The problem is fixed now, but I have zero idea why. I can see the how, but I've mapped everything by direct field access. Hibernate shouldn't be at all dependent on accessors to do anything, and in my own implementation of equals, the accessors still just return the same object or an object that would return true for a call to equals.

Anyway, 'solution' found, explanation beyond me. People can either comment on this answer and I'll just accept my own answer, or put my solution above with an explanation in their own answer and I'll accept theirs.

Low hanging fruit people! ;)

share|improve this answer

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