Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say we have a view controller with one sub view. the subview takes up the center of the screen with 100 px margins on all sides. We then add a bunch of little stuff to click on inside that subview. We are only using the subview to take advantage of the new frame ( x=0, y=0 inside the subview is actually 100,100 in the parent view).

Then, imagine that we have something behind the subview, like a menu. I want the user to be able to select any of the "little stuff" in the subview, but if there is nothing there, I want touches to pass through it (since the background is clear anyway) to the buttons behind it.

How can I do this? It looks like touchesBegan goes through, but buttons don't work.

share|improve this question
    
I thought transparent (alpha 0) UIViews aren’t supposed to respond to touch events? –  Evadne Wu Jun 16 '10 at 0:56

8 Answers 8

up vote 132 down vote accepted

Create a custom view for your container and override the pointInside: message to return NO when the point isn't within an eligible child view, like this:

@interface PassthroughView : UIView
@end

@implementation PassthroughView
-(BOOL)pointInside:(CGPoint)point withEvent:(UIEvent *)event {
    for (UIView *view in self.subviews) {
        if (!view.hidden && view.alpha > 0 && view.userInteractionEnabled && [view pointInside:[self convertPoint:point toView:view] withEvent:event])
            return YES;
    }
    return NO;
}
@end

Using this view as a container will allow any of its children to receive touches but the view itself will be transparent to events.

share|improve this answer
2  
Interesting. I need to dive into the responder chain more. –  Sean Clark Hess Oct 26 '10 at 15:23
    
Thank you so much for your edit. Really helped me! –  Blounty Jun 5 '12 at 23:42
1  
you need to check if the view is visible as well, then you also need to check if the subviews are visible before testing them. –  The Lazy Coder Jun 20 '12 at 2:56
    
I use the above example in my production code and it correctly ignores hidden views. The pointInside: method already takes care of checking the hidden flag as far as I can tell. –  John Stephen Jun 22 '12 at 20:35
1  
You should also check the alpha of the view. Quite often I'll hide a view by setting the alpha to zero. A view with zero alpha should act like a hidden view. –  Ben Smiley Dec 3 '13 at 17:19

I also use

myView.userInteractionEnabled = NO;

No need to subclass. Works fine.

share|improve this answer
16  
This will also disable user interaction for any subviews –  pixelfreak Aug 15 '13 at 10:03

From Apple:

Event forwarding is a technique used by some applications. You forward touch events by invoking the event-handling methods of another responder object. Although this can be an effective technique, you should use it with caution. The classes of the UIKit framework are not designed to receive touches that are not bound to them .... If you want to conditionally forward touches to other responders in your application, all of these responders should be instances of your own subclasses of UIView.

Apples Best Practise:

Do not explicitly send events up the responder chain (via nextResponder); instead, invoke the superclass implementation and let the UIKit handle responder-chain traversal.

instead you can override:

-(BOOL)pointInside:(CGPoint)point withEvent:(UIEvent *)event

in your UIView subclass and return NO if you want that touch to be sent up the responder chain (I.E. to views behind your view with nothing in it).

share|improve this answer
1  
It would be awesome to have a link to the docs you're quoting, along with the quotes themselves. –  morgancodes Jul 12 '12 at 20:07
1  
I added the links to the relevant places in the documentation for you –  jackslash Jul 13 '12 at 10:56

Building on what John posted, here is an example that will allow touch events to pass through all subviews of a view except for buttons:

-(BOOL)pointInside:(CGPoint)point withEvent:(UIEvent *)event
{
    // Allow buttons to receive press events.  All other views will get ignored
    for( id foundView in self.subviews )
    {
        if( [foundView isKindOfClass:[UIButton class]] )
        {
            UIButton *foundButton = foundView;

            if( foundButton.isEnabled  &&  !foundButton.hidden &&  [foundButton pointInside:[self convertPoint:point toView:foundButton] withEvent:event] )
                return YES;
        }        
    }
    return NO;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Need to check if the view is visible, and if the subviews are visible. –  The Lazy Coder Jun 20 '12 at 2:57

I created a category to do this.

a little method swizzling and the view is golden.

The header

//UIView+PassthroughParent.h
@interface UIView (PassthroughParent)

- (BOOL) passthroughParent;
- (void) setPassthroughParent:(BOOL) passthroughParent;

@end

The implementation file

#import "UIView+PassthroughParent.h"

@implementation UIView (PassthroughParent)

+ (void)load{
    Swizz([UIView class], @selector(pointInside:withEvent:), @selector(passthroughPointInside:withEvent:));
}

- (BOOL)passthroughParent{
    NSNumber *passthrough = [self propertyValueForKey:@"passthroughParent"];
    if (passthrough) return passthrough.boolValue;
    return NO;
}
- (void)setPassthroughParent:(BOOL)passthroughParent{
    [self setPropertyValue:[NSNumber numberWithBool:passthroughParent] forKey:@"passthroughParent"];
}

- (BOOL)passthroughPointInside:(CGPoint)point withEvent:(UIEvent *)event{
    // Allow buttons to receive press events.  All other views will get ignored
    if (self.passthroughParent){
        if (self.alpha != 0 && !self.isHidden){
            for( id foundView in self.subviews )
            {
                if ([foundView alpha] != 0 && ![foundView isHidden] && [foundView pointInside:[self convertPoint:point toView:foundView] withEvent:event])
                    return YES;
            }
        }
        return NO;
    }
    else {
        return [self passthroughPointInside:point withEvent:event];// Swizzled
    }
}

@end

You will need to add my Swizz.h and Swizz.m

located Here

After that, you just Import the UIView+PassthroughParent.h in your {Project}-Prefix.pch file, and every view will have this ability.

every view will take points, but none of the blank space will.

I also recommend using a clear background.

myView.passthroughParent = YES;
myView.backgroundColor = [UIColor clearColor];

EDIT

I created my own property bag, and that was not included previously.

Header file

// NSObject+PropertyBag.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface NSObject (PropertyBag)

- (id) propertyValueForKey:(NSString*) key;
- (void) setPropertyValue:(id) value forKey:(NSString*) key;

@end

Implementation File

// NSObject+PropertyBag.m

#import "NSObject+PropertyBag.h"



@implementation NSObject (PropertyBag)

+ (void) load{
    [self loadPropertyBag];
}

+ (void) loadPropertyBag{
    @autoreleasepool {
        static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
        dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
            Swizz([NSObject class], NSSelectorFromString(@"dealloc"), @selector(propertyBagDealloc));
        });
    }
}

__strong NSMutableDictionary *_propertyBagHolder; // Properties for every class will go in this property bag
- (id) propertyValueForKey:(NSString*) key{
    return [[self propertyBag] valueForKey:key];
}
- (void) setPropertyValue:(id) value forKey:(NSString*) key{
    [[self propertyBag] setValue:value forKey:key];
}
- (NSMutableDictionary*) propertyBag{
    if (_propertyBagHolder == nil) _propertyBagHolder = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithCapacity:100];
    NSMutableDictionary *propBag = [_propertyBagHolder valueForKey:[[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"%p",self]];
    if (propBag == nil){
        propBag = [NSMutableDictionary dictionary];
        [self setPropertyBag:propBag];
    }
    return propBag;
}
- (void) setPropertyBag:(NSDictionary*) propertyBag{
    if (_propertyBagHolder == nil) _propertyBagHolder = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithCapacity:100];
    [_propertyBagHolder setValue:propertyBag forKey:[[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"%p",self]];
}

- (void)propertyBagDealloc{
    [self setPropertyBag:nil];
    [self propertyBagDealloc];//Swizzled
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
passthroughPointInside method is working well for me (even without using any of the passthroughparent or swizz stuff - just rename passthroughPointInside to pointInside), thanks a lot. –  Benjamin Piette Mar 8 '13 at 15:29
    
What is propertyValueForKey? –  Skotch Oct 31 '13 at 17:34
    
Hmm. Nobody pointed that out before. I built a custom pointer dictionary that holds properties in a class extension. Ill see if I can find it to include it here. –  The Lazy Coder Oct 31 '13 at 17:37

According to the 'iPhone Application Programming Guide':

Turning off delivery of touch events. By default, a view receives touch events, but you can set its userInteractionEnabled property to NO to turn off delivery of events. A view also does not receive events if it’s hidden or if it’s transparent.

http://developer.apple.com/iphone/library/documentation/iPhone/Conceptual/iPhoneOSProgrammingGuide/EventHandling/EventHandling.html

Updated: Removed example - reread the question...

Do you have any gesture processing on the views that may be processing the taps before the button gets it? Does the button work when you don't have the transparent view over it?

Any code samples of non-working code?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I wrote in my question that the normal touches work in underneath views, but UIButtons and other elements don't work. –  Sean Clark Hess Jun 16 '10 at 15:52

As far as I know, you are supposed to be able to do this by overriding the hitTest: method. I did try it but could not get it to work properly.

In the end I created a series of transparent views around the touchable object so that they did not cover it. Bit of a hack for my issue this worked fine.

share|improve this answer

Taking tips from the other answers and reading up on Apple's documentation, I created this simple library for solving your problem:
https://github.com/natrosoft/NATouchThroughView
It makes it easy to draw views in Interface Builder that should pass touches through to an underlying view.

I think method swizzling is overkill and very dangerous to do in production code because you are directly messing with Apple's base implementation and making an application-wide change that could cause unintended consequences.

There is a demo project and hopefully the README does a good job explaining what to do. To address the OP, you would change the clear UIView that contains the buttons to class NATouchThroughView in Interface Builder. Then find the clear UIView that overlays the menu that you want to be tap-able. Change that UIView to class NARootTouchThroughView in Interface Builder. It can even be the root UIView of your view controller if you intend those touches to pass through to the underlying view controller. Check out the demo project to see how it works. It's really quite simple, safe, and non-invasive

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.