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I am seeing a lot of examples on how to style Selected rows in DataGrid such as this one:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1223280/how-can-i-set-the-color-of-a-selected-row-in-datagrid

Can i just disabled selected row styling? i don't want to have to override every single thing that selected row changes. Just don't want any visible changes. Gotta be easier way than to create templates..

or..

disable selecting rows, if that is easier.. but from browsing this forum that seems hacky as well

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2496814/disable-selecting-in-wpf-datagrid

share|improve this question
up vote 59 down vote accepted

figured out the XAML to get rid of selection style.. not ideal, but close enough..

<Style x:Key="CellStyle" TargetType="{x:Type DataGridCell}">
    <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="Black" />
    <Style.Triggers>
        <Trigger Property="IsSelected" Value="True">
            <Setter Property="Background" Value="{x:Null}" />
            <Setter Property="BorderBrush" Value="{x:Null}" />
        </Trigger>
    </Style.Triggers>
</Style>
share|improve this answer
1  
Strangely, does not disable the selected border. – BrainSlugs83 Nov 1 '13 at 22:14
1  
This was driving me mad , thanks , +1 – eran otzap Dec 24 '13 at 17:20
1  
This works, but I don't think the line: <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="Black" /> is necessary. – maxp May 29 '15 at 9:22
    
This works only if the SelectionUnit property on the DataGrid is set to "Cell" – John Melville Jan 2 at 16:31

I found another way that works well for my situation. I set this style for all cells because I don't want the user to select any cells.

<Style TargetType="{x:Type DataGridCell}">
    <Setter Property="IsHitTestVisible" Value="False"/>
</Style>
share|improve this answer
    
very nice.. i will have to test this soon – Sonic Soul Aug 13 '10 at 22:07
    
where do you put this in the DataGrid XAML to apply it to all cells? – BuddyJoe Sep 8 '10 at 13:29
5  
Problem is this doesn't help with keyboard navigation. – MarqueIV Apr 25 '11 at 19:38
1  
Note that this will also prevent the user from clicking links and buttons in the cells. – dgvid Jun 2 '11 at 16:12
3  
This also disables sorting on columns – sksallaj Sep 11 '13 at 15:11

Here's what worked for me:

<DataGrid>
    <DataGrid.CellStyle>
        <Style TargetType="{x:Type DataGridCell}">
            <Style.Triggers>
                <Trigger Property="DataGridCell.IsSelected" Value="True">
                    <Setter Property="BorderBrush">
                        <Setter.Value>
                            <SolidColorBrush Color="Transparent"/>
                        </Setter.Value>
                    </Setter>
                    <Setter Property="Foreground"
                            Value="{DynamicResource
                                   {x:Static SystemColors.ControlTextBrushKey}}"/>
                    <Setter Property="Background">
                        <Setter.Value>
                            <SolidColorBrush Color="Transparent"/>
                        </Setter.Value>
                    </Setter>
                </Trigger>
            </Style.Triggers>
        </Style>
    </DataGrid.CellStyle>
    <!-- ... -->
</DataGrid>
share|improve this answer
    
This worked for me as well. Accepted answer didn't work. – The Muffin Man Jul 20 '15 at 18:04
    
This is what I am looking for! – Narottam Nov 2 '15 at 6:16

This is relatively straightforward:

datagrid.SelectionChanged += (obj, e) =>
  Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Render, new Action(() =>
    datagrid.UnselectAll()));

This disables all selection on the DataGrid.

If you don't want to disable selection entirely but just hide it you'll need to modify the template.

share|improve this answer
    
well for one i've tried that, and it still lets me select. this kind of override prevents some selections, but not all. at least visually, i can still see the row selected. – Sonic Soul Jun 16 '10 at 2:28
    
Ok, I tried it too and discovered you have to use a Dispatcher callback. The new code in my answer actually works, but it is three lines now instead of one. Is that too "hacky" for you? The reason the BeginInvoke is required is that MultiSelector's selection change handler tries to lock in the user's selection change with its own Dispatcher callback. – Ray Burns Jun 16 '10 at 3:18
    
thanks, i appreciate your help with this. but what does number of lines have to do with "hacky" code? there reason this is hacky, is because it isnt actually disabling anything, just unselecting all every time selection changes.. and using a dispatcher invoke.. how is this not a hack? – Sonic Soul Jun 16 '10 at 19:07
1  
also, your code doesn't seem to be working for me.. (i tried it out of curiosity) – Sonic Soul Jun 16 '10 at 21:08
1  
You are wrong. Dispatcher has the ability to cross threads when necessary, but will only do so if you tell it to do so by selecting a Dispatcher for a different thread than you are on. When used within a UI object like this, Dispatcher.Invoke and Dispatcher.BeginInvoke simply execute the method - one synchronously, the other asynchronously. No other thread gets involved in any way, shape, or form. Glad I could clear this up for you. I can see why you were leery of using Dispatcher.BeginInvoke because of your misunderstanding of what it did. – Ray Burns Jun 17 '10 at 14:24

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