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What is the standard way to retrive and check for the argc and argv and what is the best usage and how to do that in linux?

Please provide examples.

"I want to have a complex command-line options and I want to use them in my application" That what I mean.

Thanks

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closed as not a real question by Billy ONeal, sepp2k, Paul R, James McNellis, tster Jun 15 '10 at 17:26

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What do you mean "check for?" Either you have int main() or you have int main(int argc, char* argv[]). If you have the former, you don't have the argument vector, if you have the latter you do. –  James McNellis Jun 15 '10 at 17:16
    
What are you trying to accomplish? A bunch of simple arguments? Complex command-line options? –  Jefromi Jun 15 '10 at 17:16
6  
Extremely unclear question. You don't have to retrieve argc/argv -- they're passed to you as arguments to main(). –  Jerry Coffin Jun 15 '10 at 17:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Please use boost program options http://www.boost.org/doc/html/program_options.html for access to the command arguments.

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1  
+1 for showing OP where to buy a wheel rather than build one. –  Crazy Eddie Jun 15 '10 at 17:27

There are (at least) two ways to write your main function:

int main()
{
}

and

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
}

If you use the second option, then your command line arguments will be in argv, which has argc # of elements:

#include <iostream>
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  for (int i = 0; i < argc; ++i)
  {
    std::cout << "arg #" << i << ": " << argv[i] << std::endl;
  }
}
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+1 for using C++ streams. –  Crazy Eddie Jun 15 '10 at 17:25
    
+1 for showing the array syntax, when so many just "char **argv". i know it's the same –  pestilence669 Apr 1 '12 at 23:55
    
std::vector<std::string> arguments(argv, arv+argc); –  TBohne May 24 '12 at 0:49

What do you want to do with them?

A simple example of usage is like the following:

// Get numbers from the command line, and put them in a vector.
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    /* get the numbers from the command line. For example:

           $ my_prog 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
    */
    std::vector<int> numbers(argc-1);
    try
    {
        std::transform(argv+1, argv+argc, numbers.begin(),
                       boost::lexical_cast<int, char*>);
    }
    catch(const std::exception&)
    {
        std::cout << "Error: You have entered invalid numbers.";
    }
}

It depends on what you are trying to do. If you have many types of arguments etc.. Then it is better to use something like boost program options.

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+1 for std::transform –  Crazy Eddie Jun 15 '10 at 17:26
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    for(int i = 0; i < argc; i++)
        printf("%s\n", argv[i]);
}

Works in both C and C++, though in C++ you should include cstdio and in C you should include stdio.h.

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1  
-1 for recommending printf –  Crazy Eddie Jun 15 '10 at 17:25
2  
As opposed to correctly answering the actual question? I'm no C++ expert, so excuse my ignorance, but what's so horrendous about printf? –  Jeriko Jun 15 '10 at 17:28
    
If the question had been tagged as C then printf would be OK. But this question is tagged C++ so you should be using the type safe mechanism provided to you be the language not relying on backward compatibility with another language. –  Loki Astari Jun 15 '10 at 18:00

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